2018 NCFADS Winter School: February 18-21st


February 18-21st | Embassy Suites in Greensboro, NC

The NC Foundation for Alcohol & Drug Studies is pleased to present the 2018 Winter School, February 18-21st at the Embassy Suites in Greensboro, NC. We are honored to have this year’s faculty filled with nationally known speakers, researchers and leaders in the field.

School Objectives:

Upon completion of the conference, participants should increase their ability to effectively care for clients and be able to:

  • Discuss several Substance Use Disorder (SUD) matters germane to North Carolina
  • Identify population specific interventions and modalities with appropriate clients
  • Examine techniques and concepts to employ with SUD clients and families;

…as well as implement these skills in their daily practice.

 

Who Should Attend?

  • Social Workers
  • Integrated Care Professionals
  • Criminal Justice
  • Juvenile Justice
  • Corrections Personnel
  • Clergy and Pastoral Care Professionals
  • Addictions and Substance Use Disorder Professionals
  • Licensed Professional Counselors
  • School Counselors
  • EAP Staff
  • Recovery Coaches and Allies
  • Public Health Workers
  • Social Services Staff
  • …and all interested others!
  • Nurses (Hospital, Clinic, Etc…)
  • Healthcare Professionals
  • Health Educators
  • Rehabilitation Counselors
  • Marriage and Family Therapists
  • Psychotherapists
  • School Nurses

Conference Schedule

 

Sunday, February 18, 2018


11:30 a.m. — Registration & Check-In

1:30 p.m.  — Opening Welcome and Information Session (WELCOME-PLENARY)

2:00 p.m.  — Concurrent Mini-Track Sessions

MINI-A: Opioid Misuse and Older Adults: A Community Crisis

MINI-B: Infectious Disease Risks in Patients

MINI-C: Ethical Dilemmas in the Digital Age

MINI-D: Prescription Drug Use: Challenges of the Generation Gap

MINI-E: Mindfulness and SUD: Why and How Mindfulness Can Reach the Unreachable

MINI-F: Drugs of Abuse – Drug Trends

MINI-G: Silos to Synergy: What You Need to Know about ‘Whole-Person’ Integrated Treatment

MINI-H: Effective Clinical Supervision: Intentionally Utilizing Supervision- Specific Approaches, Models and Interventions

3:45 p.m. — Break

4:00 p.m. — Concurrent Mini-Track Sessions (Continued)

5:45 p.m. — Conclusion of Day 1: Dinner On Your Own

7:30 p.m. — Evening Sessions

EVENING-A: Open AA Meeting (Does NOT Qualify for NBCC Hours)
Facilitator: David W.

EVENING-B: NA Meeting (Does NOT Qualify for NBCC Hours)
Facilitator: Cameron L.

8:30 p.m. — Conclusion of Evening Sessions

Monday, February 19, 2018


7:00 a.m. — Breakfast for Hotel Guests

8:00 a.m. — Late Check-In

9:00 a.m. — Opening Plenary Session (PLENARY-A): “Medical Aspects of Opiates and Current Trends,” by Roy E. Smith, MD

10:00 a.m. – Refreshment Break

10:15 a.m. — Concurrent Plenary Sessions:

PLENARY-B:  The “Treatment Resistant” Client (Virtual Session)
Speaker: Jennifer Hodgson, PhD.

PLENARY-C: Military and Veterans: Where Substance Abuse and PTSD Meet
Speaker: Nyi Myint, MSW, MBA, LCSW, LCAS, CCS

12:00 p.m. — Lunch & Plenary (PLENARY-D): “An Invisible Epidemic: Alcohol Misuse and Abuse Prevention in Older Adults”

Speaker: C. Ray Taylor, EdD., LPA

2:00 p.m. — Concurrent Main Track Sessions

MAIN-A: Brain Disease with a Relational Solution: Working with Addiction through the Lens of Neuropsychology and Attachment Theory

MAIN-B: Working with Adolescents involved in the Juvenile Justice System

MAIN-C: If It’s an Epidemic, Shouldn’t You Use Medication to Treat It? Exploring the Medical Options for Treating Opioid Use Disorder

MAIN-D: Sorting through the Signs and Symptoms: Understanding & Treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

MAIN-E: Clinical Supervision: Leading through Serving

MAIN-F: Developments in Addiction Treatment (MAT, Relapse Abatement)

MAIN-G: Youth Mental Health First Aid and Other Promising Prevention Programs

3:30 p.m. — Break

3:45 p.m. — Concurrent Main Track Sessions (Continued)

5:45 p.m. — Conclusion of Day 2: Dinner On Your Own

7:30 p.m. — Evening Session (EVENING-C): “Memo to Self” (Film & Discussion)

Facilitator: Tony Beatty, MA, LCAS, CCS

9:30 p.m. — Conclusion of Evening Session

 

Tuesday, February 20, 2018


7:00 – 8:00 a.m. — Breakfast for Hotel Guests

8:15 – 10:15 a.m. — Concurrent Main Track Sessions (Continued)

10:15 a.m. — Refreshment Break

10:30 p.m. —  Concurrent Plenary Sessions:

PLENARY-E: Yoga & Meditation into Your Practice
Speaker: Alanna Brewton

PLENARY-F: Evidence-Based Substance Use Disorder Practices and Techniques
Speaker: Shari Sias, PhD

12:00 p.m. — Lunch & Plenary (PLENARY-G): “Treating the Criminal Justice Involved Population: They are Not the Same!”

Speaker: Mike Torch, MS, LADC

2:00 p.m. — Concurrent Main Track Sessions (Continued)

3:30 p.m. — Break

3:45 p.m. — Concurrent Main Track Sessions (Continued)

5:45 p.m. — Conclusion of Day 3: Dinner On Your Own

7:30 p.m. — Evening Session (EVENING-D): “Paper Tigers” (Film & Discussion)

Facilitator: Donald McDonald, MSW, LCAS

9:30 p.m. — Conclusion of Evening Session

 

Wednesday, February 21, 2018


7:00 – 8:00 a.m. — Breakfast for Hotel Guests

8:15 a.m. — Concurrent Main Track Sessions (Continued)

10:15 a.m. — Refreshment Break

10:30 a.m. — Closing Plenary Session

PLENARY-H: “Latest Research in Brain Addiction.”
Speaker: Darryl Inaba, PharmD., CATC-V, CADC III

Registration Options & Fees

Full-School Option (FSO)
$585.00

Includes:

  • Training & Materials for the Entire School
  • (1) Main Track
  • (1) Mini Track
  • All Plenary Sessions
  • Refreshments and Lunches on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

If staying at Embassy Suites, breakfast is included in hotel costs.

*Fee does not include housing or evening meals.

Track/Plenary Only Option (TPO)
$510.00

Includes:

  • Training & Materials for the Opening Session
  • (1) Main Track
  • All Plenary Sessions
  • Refreshments and Lunches on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

If staying at Embassy Suites, breakfast is included in hotel costs.

*Fee does not include housing, evening meals, or a Mini Track.

Mini-Track Only Option (MTO)
$130.00

Includes:

  • Training & Materials for (1) Sunday Mini Track
  • Refreshments on Sunday Only.

If staying at Embassy Suites, breakfast is included in hotel costs.

*Fee does not include housing, meals, main tracks, or plenary sessions.

IMPORTANT Registration Information

PLEASE READ THIS CAREFULLY: YOU MUST MAKE YOUR OWN HOTEL ARRANGEMENTS SEPARATE FROM THE SCHOOL REGISTRATION. TO GET THE SPECIAL “RATE OF $110.00 + TAXES (King or Double Non-Smoking) YOU MUST CALL THE EMBASSY SUITES DIRECTLY: (336) 668-4535. HOUSING DEADLINE IS JANUARY 27, 2018.

NCFADS School Registration Information

FIRST, use the online registration form to complete the registration process and submit to NCFADS by 11:59 p.m., February 14, 2018.


Register for the 2018 NCFADS Winter School

SECOND, all Full-time Students or Mini-Track only Students , must validate the registration process at check-in between 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 18, 2018, at the Embassy Suites, Greensboro, NC. Track/Plenary Student enrollees may check-in from 8:00 – 9:00 a.m. on Monday, February 19, 2018. Early enrollment is suggested since space is limited and courses are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. (Online registration is preferred and may expedite the process.)

FOR MULTIPLE REGISTRATIONS, a registration form for each participant must be completed and accompanied by payment and/or official authorizations. Photocopies of the registration form will be accepted. If you are registering for someone else, make certain all pertinent information is forwarded to him or her.

 

Check-In & Check-Out Process

All mini-tracks will meet from 2:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m. on Sunday afternoon, February 18, 2018. Main tracks and plenary sessions begin on Monday morning, February 19, 2018, and continue until 12:00 p.m., Wednesday, February 21, 2018. You will only attend one track and one mini-track during the school. All Full-time Students (FTO) will be automatically registered for the opening session, plenary sessions and closing luncheon. The registration system will inform you of the availability of your track/mini-track topic selections as you register. Early registration is encouraged. Use of our online registration process is encouraged to expedite your registration. Your confirmation email indicating topic assignments (based upon space availability at the time of registration) will be sent to you immediately after your pre-registration. All Full-time Student participants (as well as Mini-Track Students) are expected to check in between 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, February 18, 2018, and attend the General Session and mini-track topic sessions beginning at 1:30 p.m.

Those who register only for Track/Plenary Only Sessions may check in on Monday morning, February 19th from 8:00 – 9:00 a.m.; then attend an opening session followed by the first track session. Embassy Suites Housing should be available by 3:45 p.m. (break time) for those staying on site. No dinner meals have been scheduled. If you need assistance concerning registration, please call the NCFADS office at 252.714.0735.

Helpful Tips

Since early registration is necessary to improve your chances of getting your top track choices, the following suggestions are offered:
If you plan to stay at the Embassy Suites, you must call directly to the hotel to get the negotiated rate. Identify yourself as a participant in the NCFADS Winter School.

At the earliest possible date after receiving word the registration process is open, complete the online registration form. Online registration for all classes is preferred.

Do not assume that your registration form will be processed by your accounting office or an administrative official before the deadline date. To avoid delays, submit your form online to the Foundation office or email a short, written approval statement from your supervisor while the agency is processing payment.

In most cases, this can save you 3 to 4 weeks in getting registered.

Mailing address: NCFADS, PO Box 4113, Greenville, NC, 27836.
Email: executivedirector@ncfads.org

Review your completed registration form to assure the following:

Your track & mini-track choices have been indicated.
All credit option choices have been selected.
All demographic information is clearly printed or typed. A correct email address is necessary for receiving your credit letters following the school.
Payment or an authorization statement by an agency official or an approved purchase order or scholarship authorization must accompany each completed registration form.
Participants seeking special accommodations due to a disability must contact the registration office by January 1, 2018.

Student Responsibilities

As a student of the school sponsored by the North Carolina Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies, you are requested to read and abide by the following statements:
You should act as a professional when dealing with staff or others who are registered for the school.

The use of alcohol and/or illicit drugs or the abuse of non-prescription drugs while at the school will not be tolerated. If such conduct is observed, NCFADS officials will ask for assistance from local law enforcement personnel. If the student is charged with a violation or continues to demonstrate behaviors detrimental to others or is considered disruptive to the mission of the school, NCFADS will immediately ask the student to leave the school; and will report the incident to the students’ employer.

The use of physical means to settle a dispute will not be tolerated. If such conduct is used by a student(s), the NCFADS staff will ask for assistance by local law enforcement personnel. If the student is charged with a violation or continues to demonstrate behaviors detrimental to others or is considered disruptive to the mission of the school, NCFADS will immediately ask the student to leave the school; and will report the incident to the student’s employer.

At the time of pre-registration, you should reveal to the NCFADS staff any serious medical condition which might cause problems while at the school. This will ensure that, in the event of an emergency, you may be treated with appropriate care by EMT or other medical professionals.

Students, who, for what ever reason are taken to a local hospital or medical clinic for treatment, must arrange for any needed transportation.

At the time of pre-registration, you will be asked to furnish the name of a family member or another designee as a contact person in case of an emergency.

At the time of pre-registration, you will be asked for a current email and mailing address. The accuracy of these addresses is necessary for receiving your credit letter after the school.

— Meet Our Keynote Speakers —

Roy Smith

Roy E. Smith
MD

Sponsored By
Pavillon

hodgsonj

Jennifer Hodgson
PhD, LMFT

Sponsored By
NCFADS

Nyi Myint

Nyi Myint
MSW, MBA, LCSW, LCAS, CCS

Sponsored By
NCFADS

Ray Taylor

C. Ray Taylor
EdD., LPA

Sponsored By
NCFADS

Alana Brewton_115x155

Alanna Brewton
LCAS

Sponsored By
NCFADS

NCFADS Logo-SQ400

Shari Sias
PhD

Sponsored By
Southeast ATTC

NCFADS Logo-SQ400

Mike Torch
MS, LADC

Sponsored By
Southeast ATTC

Darryl informal 1

Darryl Inaba
PharmD., CATC-V, CADC III

Sponsored By
Dominion Diagnostics


Roy E. Smith, MD

A board certified in addiction medicine and family medicine and provides medical care to patients at Pavillon.  In addition, Dr. Smith is involved with the evaluation and treatment of Pavillon patients in the professional program.

Prior to coming to Pavillon, in addition to having his own private practice in Camden, SC, he was the medical director of the LRADAC Detox Facility in Columbia, SC. He is a graduate of The Citadel and received his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Dr. Smith is the president of the SC chapter of American Society of Addiction Medicine and an Assistant Professor at USC School of Medicine at Greenville Health System.


Nyi Myint, MSW, MBA, LCSW, LCAS, CCS

Served in the United State Army for twenty-five years, retiring at the rank of Major to pursue a career in human services.  He is a veteran of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom and served during a NATO treaty enforcement tour in Bosnia.  He has a Masters of Business Administration from Pfeiffer University, a Masters of Social Work from the University of North Carolina Charlotte and a graduate certificate in substance abuse from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.  He has worked clinically as a substance abuse counselor at the Freedom House Recovery Center in the Facility Based Crisis Unit and is trained in the treatment of post- traumatic stress disorder.  Mr. Myint previously worked for the Alcohol / Drug Council of North Carolina in 2013 as the clinical program director on a project that provides no-cost substance abuse assessments and brief intervention services to members of the North Carolina National Guard.  Mr. Myint has also served as an adjunct at the UNC School of Social Work instructing Clinical Addiction Practice.  Currently, Mr. Myint maintains a small private practice in Hillsborough, NC and graduated from the North Carolina Central University School of Law in December 2017.


Shari Sias, PhD

An Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Alcohol and Drug Studies Minor at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. She holds a Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the College of William & Mary; an M.Ed. in Clinical Counseling from The Citadel; and a B.A in Counseling and Rehabilitation from Marshall University.

Dr. Sias’ research foci are (a) addictions counseling, (b) counselor development and supervision, (c) mental health counseling, and (d) family counseling. She has 30 refereed publications, many of which are in the flagship journals of the American Counseling Association (ACA; Journal of Counseling & Development [JCD], Journal of Addictions & Offenders Counseling [JAOC], and Counseling and Values [JCV]). Dr. Sias has led numerous (45) professional presentations at international, national, regional, and state conference. She is a member of the American Counseling Association’s divisions of the International Association of Addictions and Offender Counselors (IAAOC) and Association of Counselor Educators and Supervisors (ACES), as well as a member of the American Mental Health Counseling Association (AMHCA).

Having worked in the counseling field since 1986, Dr. Sias has a wide variety of clinical counseling and supervision experience, including substance abuse/process addictions, mental health, crisis, and family counseling. She possesses more than 15 years of professional experience in the field, as a social worker, case manager, clinical counselor and clinical supervisor, in locations including greater Charleston, S.C.; Lynchburg, Va.; greater Philadelphia, Pa., and greater Boston, Ma., and is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) in North Carolina.


Darryl S. Inaba, PharmD., CATC-V, CADC III

Director of Clinical and Behavioral Health Services for the Addictions Recovery Center and Director of Research and Education of CNS Productions in Medford, Oregon. He is an associate Clinical Professor at the University of California in San Francisco, CA., and a Lifetime Fellow at Haight Ashbury Free Clinics, Inc., in San Francisco, CA. Dr. Inaba has authored several papers, award winning educational films and is co-author of Uppers, Downers, All Arounder, a text on addiction and related disorders that is used in more than 400 colleges and universities. He has been honored with over 90 individual awards for his work in the areas of prevention and treatment of substance abuse problems. He is a popular speaker at workshops and conferences nationally and internationally.


Jennifer Hodgson, PhD.

Jennifer Hodgson, PhD, LMFT, is a Professor at East Carolina University where she also serves as Director for their Medical Family Therapy doctoral degree program. She is an accomplished presenter and author with a specialization in integrated behavioral health care, family therapy skills and training, behavioral health ethics and supervision, and biopsychosocial-spiritual domains of health.  She has co-edited two books on Medical Family Therapy and boasts that her greatest accomplishments are being mom to her three children and wife to her husband, Steve.


C. Ray Taylor, EdD, LPA

Chair of the Human Services Department at Pitt Community College where he led the development of programs in Substance Abuse and Gerontology. He received Masters Degrees in Psychology and Counselor Education from East Carolina University and a Doctorate in Adult and Community College Education from North Carolina State University. Ray has a background in mental health, developmental disabilities, and educational program development and administration. He is nationally certified in Adult Mental Health First Aid and Youth Mental Health First Aid. Ray is credentialed to teach the MHFA curriculum for Older Adults and Those Who Care for Them, Veterans and Military Families, Higher Education, and Public Safety including Law Enforcement and Corrections.

Special areas of interest include substance use among aging populations, teambuilding through recreational activities, and development of tools for crisis ministry in faith-based communities.


Alanna Brewton, LCAS

Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist (LCAS), Registered Yoga Instructor and Certified Heartmath Trainer. Alanna has over 15 years of experience working in the addictions field. She spent 12 years working for Carolinas Healthcare in their medical detoxification program, and then transitioned to the Intensive Outpatient program. Alanna takes a holistic approach when working with clients combining the mind, body and spirit in counseling. She works with adults around a wide assortment of issues and concerns including grief and loss, codependency, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, trauma, addiction and other life challenges.


Michael Torch, MA, LADC

A Criminologist and addiction treatment provider with over 35 years of experience.  He is a Senior Technology Transfer Specialist with Brown University/New England Addiction Technology Transfer Center in its efforts to disseminate Evidence-Based Practices.  He was recognized by the New Hampshire Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor’s Association in 2002 with its “Life Time Achievement Award”. He is currently working in Outpatient Practice and Behavioral Health consultation. Michael has been a trainer of alcohol and drug counselors for over 30 years and currently serves on the faculty of Brown University/New England Addiction Technology Transfer Center and the New England School of Addiction Studies.  He has extensive experience treating chemically dependent adolescents and trauma victims. His professional experience includes practice in public schools, correctional environments, treating law enforcement personnel, inpatient chemical dependency programs, outpatient practice and as a consultant to a First Nation Healing Program.  He presently serves as a member of the US Probation Service’s New England Critical Incident Stress Management Team. Mike is a certified Trainer with The International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc. and provided Critical Incident Stress Debriefing to the Boston Police Department subsequent to the Marathon Bombing.

— Meet The NCFADS Faculty Presenters —


Tony Beatty, MA, LCAS, CCS

Tony began his first career as a part-time substance abuse tech at the Seventh Street Detoxification Center in Charlotte in August 1982.  He retired in November 2012 as the Program Administrator for the Mecklenburg County Substance Abuse Services Division of the Provided Services Organization.  He has been teaching in the substance abuse counseling program at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) since January 2012.  Tony founded and is the advisor for the CPCC Collegiate Recovery Community.  Tony earned a BA in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1982, a Master of Arts in Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 1989 and a Master of Divinity degree from Gardner-Webb University in 1998.  Tony is a Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist and a Certified Clinical Supervisor.  In addition to serving on the NCFADS Board he is currently the president of Addiction Professionals of North Carolina, a statewide program that represents those who provide treatment for substance use disorders.


Ann Hamlin, MS

Ann has a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry and a Master’s Degree in Forensic Drug Chemistry.  She began her career in 1989  as a  North Carolina SBI Agent assigned to the Crime Laboratory. She has been working in the Drug Chemistry section for the past 28 years. Ann  is  clandestine laboratory and confined space certified.  She has assisted the NC General Assembly for the past 12 years on controlled substances matters and have presented at the Conference of the District Attorneys.


Beverly Hill, RN

Beverly is a registered nurse passionate in the care of persons who suffer from addiction.  She has specialized for over thirty years in the field of treatment of those addicted to opiates as well as public health. Beverly is the past co-owner and director of two opiate addiction treatment centers and former public health nurse who believes that recovery encompasses caring for the body as well as emotional and spiritual.


Jessica Holton, MSW, LCSW, LCAS

Jessica has nearly two decades of experience and is a private practitioner specializing in treating Trauma & Stress Related Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, and Addictions. She earned her Master of Social Work and became certified in Social Work Practice with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing from East Carolina University. Jessica is active in leadership roles with the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) at the local, state, and national levels: Co-Chair of NASW-NC’s Greenville’s Local Program Unit from 2005 to 2012; Elected as NASW-NC’s President Elect from 2011 to 2012; NASW-NC’s President from 2012 to 2014; Jessica is has been a Delegate for NASW-NC since 2011.  She was appointed to NASW’s Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug (ATOD) Specialty Section Committee as a committee member in 2008, and then appointed as the Chair in 2010 to 2016, in which she is currently a committee member (2016-2018). Jessica is involved with Addiction Professionals of North Carolina, as well. Jessica has written many professional newsletter articles, compiled a four-hour continuing education curriculum (pending approval) and has presented nationwide at numerous conferences. She also received the East Carolina University School of Social Work Rising Star Alumni Award and the 2005 Community Service Award from the Wilson Resource Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.


Dawn Cambridge Johnson, MA, PMP

Dawn is a project manager in the Systems Performance Section, of the North Carolina Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services.  Some of her major projects include the Safer Schools Initiative, the Community Behavioral Health Service Needs, Providers and Gaps Analysis, the MH/DD/SAS State Strategic Plan and the Behavioral Health Crisis Referral System. Prior to her current role Dawn was the Data Management Team Leader for the North Carolina Division of Social Services.  Dawn has also worked for the state Office of Juvenile Justice in Prevention and Intervention programs. In addition to her fulltime duties, Dawn serves as an adjunct instructor of Sociology at Durham Technical Community College. Dawn over 18 years of public service and experience in the fields of Education, Human Services, Program Development, Training and Project Management.

Dawn received her Master’s degree in Sociology and Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from East Carolina University (Greenville, NC).  Dawn earned her Project Management Professional (PMP) certification from Project Management Institute (PMI) and is certified as a Youth Mental Health First Aid Instructor by the National Council of Behavioral Health.  Dawn believes in leadership through service to others and is passionate about spreading the message of hope to all who will listen.


Ed Johnson, M.Ed., MAC, LPC, CCS

Ed otained a Bachelor’s Degree from Auburn University and a Master’s Degree in Clinical Counseling from the Citadel. Ed is currently the Carolinas and Kentucky Program Manager for the Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (Southeast ATTC) located at the National Center for Primary Care, Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta. For the previous twenty years, he held various clinical positions at Charleston Center (Charleston County Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services).  Starting in November 1999 he served as Program Administrator for the Opioid Treatment Program and Infectious Disease Service at Charleston Center. He has provided numerous trainings in the Southeast on Recovery-Oriented Systems of Care, Professional Ethics, HIV / Addiction, Opioid Use Disorders / Treatment and issues related to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Individuals and Addiction and Clinical Supervision He is currently credentialed / licensed as a Master Addiction Counselor (MAC), a Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS), and a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC).


Joyce Massey-Smith, MPA

Joyce is currently serving as the Adult Services Section Chief at NCDHHS Division of Aging and Adult Services.  Her career in the field of aging and adult services includes serving as a planner at the Region I Area Agency on Aging and later serving as the AAA Director in Region I.   She served in various leadership positions in the NC4A and the NC Association on Aging and Disaster Services at the NWNC Chapter of the American Red Cross.  She was  awarded Mature Market Media Award for Family Caregiver Newsletter and the PBS series on “Positive Aging in NC”  and had the honor of serving as staff support at the 1995 White House Conference on Aging. After leaving the AAA and coming to work for DHHS, she served as a regional Adult Programs Representative and the Chief of the Budget, Planning and Systems Support Section.

Joyce studied gerontology and earned a BSW at UNC-Greensboro and later a Master’s Degree in Public Administration with a concentration in aging and public policy.  Areas of interest Include rural social work practice, performance outcome measurement in human services, and team development as a means of improving agency outcomes.


Cameron L.

“I am 28 years old and have been clean from alcohol and other drugs since 12/29/12. I grew up in Virginia and found myself in a heap of trouble from the use of drugs. Wanting a way out I enrolled in a treatment center here in Greensboro. I then made the move here to begin a new life. I am married and have a 9 year old son.”


Donald McDonald, MSW

Donald is a Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist and has been working in the addiction treatment and recovery field since 2010. Mr. McDonald served in The United States Navy from 1986 to 1992. He graduated from NC State in 1997 with a Bachelor of Arts in English Teacher Education. Mr. McDonald graduated with a Master of Social Work from UNC Chapel Hill. His concentration was community, management, and policy practice in the addictions certification track.

Donald McDonald is the Executive Director of Addiction Professionals of North Carolina (APNC), a 501(c)(6) nonprofit membership organization. APNC’s mission is to empower its prevention, treatment, and recovery professionals. The unrelenting addiction epidemic and North Carolina’s evolving continuum of care require deliberate education and vigilant advocacy. APNC keeps its members up to date on what’s trending in the field, providing training on exciting innovations and updates on pertinent legislation and policy. APNC’s network of helpers and change agents continually network to improve their practice and amplify their voice. Donald is a Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist and holds a Master of Social Work from UNC Chapel Hill.


Michael E. McGuire LCSW, LCAS, LMFT, CSS, MINT

Michael is employed by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Social Work as both a Clinical Assistant Professor and the Director of the Substance Use and Addiction Specialty program.  He is a licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT), and Clinical Addictions Specialist (LCAS), and is a credentialed supervisor. His areas of expertise include: adolescent and family development, childhood trauma, substance use treatment, experiential learning, issues around military families, motivational interviewing, feedback informed treatment, clinical supervision, clinical model implementation, ethics, and workforce development.


Maggie Minsk, LPC, NCC

Maggie is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of North Carolina, a Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC), a Certified Instructor (CI) and Certified Hypnotherapist (CHt), and a Certified Clinical Military Counselor (CCMC). She received her LPC and NCC licenses in 2009 and has been a certified hypnotherapist since 2006, writing her Master’s thesis how to learn optimism quickly using hypnosis. Maggie has been intensively trained in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for treating those with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and specializes in helping clients work through trauma to build toward a life of satisfaction and contentment. She has been teaching mindfulness since 2011 and hypnosis certification classes to clinicians since 2012 and has her own private practice in Wake Forest, NC – www.maggieminsk.com


Sarah Potter, MA

Sarah is the  Section Chief: Community Wellness, Prevention and Health Integration, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. Sarah is a talented, versatile human services leader with M.A. in Public Administration and twenty years experience. She is adept in communication and presentation skills. She has a successful track record in strategic planning, directing grant programs, professional training, organizational development, grant proposal writing, instructional design, board and donor relations, program development, social media campaigns, staff and volunteer management, program evaluation, and mobile app development.


Britta M. Starke, LCSW, LCAS, CCS

Britta is employed by UNC Healthcare in Chapel Hill, N.C. where she is Director of UNC Hospital’s Alcohol and Substance Abuse Outpatient Program.  She is trained in advanced Motivational Interviewing, is a Certified Satir Family Therapist, and a member of the International Association of Trauma Professionals. She is also trained in CBT, ACT, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, and has significant training in the neurobiology/molecular biology of chronic medical conditions and the connection to mental health and trauma history.

Britta and her colleagues integrated substance abuse assessment and counseling using a team-based approach in both an outpatient specialty clinic and a Family Practice clinic.  She provides bi-annual training to local/regional law enforcement, EMS, Paramedics, and university police personnel; as part of their yearly training.  She has presented MI and integrated care to surgeons, doctors, and social workers at a recent Houston Medical Center Conference, and attended the European Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism and liver disease, in Valencia, Spain.  As a result of that trip, she and her specialty clinic team have IRB approval to collect data on the prevalence of trauma and cirrhosis/liver disease.  Britta, and her team have begun the process of integrating care at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, to expand the collegiate recovery program, is involved in building a crisis team in the emergency department to specifically address opioid addiction, and part of a team to provide psychopharmacology with MI to patients detoxing from alcohol. Britta bases her clinical supervision on an integrated treatment approach.


Kelly Wedell EdS, LPCS

Kelly began her counseling career as the primary therapist for Our VOICE, Inc., Asheville, NC’s rape crisis center. This initial experience of understanding how overwhelming events, life situations and familial relationships impact all aspects of a person’s being is the foundational perspective she has brought into such diverse settings as adolescent residential treatment, a residential recovery program, wilderness treatment and private practice during her 19 years of clinical practice. She brings specialized knowledge in utilizing neuropsychology, supporting addiction recovery and working somatically with attachment and trauma with advanced training in EMDR, and Hakomi (a mindfulness-based experiential somatic approach to counseling). She also supports the therapeutic community in Asheville, NC by offering attachment informed supervision. When not working, Kelly enjoys playing in the mountains of WNC with her family, resorting their 1932 bungalow and walking her own recovery path.


David W.

David is in recovery and promotes the value of Alcoholics Anonymous across the state. He also provides presentations to professionals and the general public.

Plenary Keynote Speakers & Session Topics

PLENARY-A: Opening Session (Monday, 2/19/18 (9:00 am) — Medical Aspects of Opiates and Current Trends

Speaker: Roy E. Smith, MD

Description: This session will provide current information about prescription opiates and heroin from a medical perspective, how their use and abuse is changing, and current information about an “overdose antidote” becoming available for home use. In addition, an update on other non-opiate drugs of abuse, and “medical marijuana” will be discussed.

// Session Sponsored By: Pavillon // 


PLENARY-B: Concurrent Session Plenary 1 (Monday, 2/19/18) (10:15-11:45am) — The “Treatment Resistant” Client

Speaker: Jennifer Hodges, Ph.D., LMFT

Description: In the behavioral health and substance abuse industry, professionals often encounter “treatment resistant” clients. Unfortunately, too many professionals take on the attitude and approach of—“if the client isn’t ready (or has not hit rock bottom), no one can help them.” Such a draconian and outdated approach, flies in the face of medical evidence, effective treatment, and healthy intervention. What does, “meeting the client where they are at” really mean? A popular sales-pitch line for marketers, but what is the clinical understanding of such a statement? How do we apply this approach in a clinical setting? Substances of abuse have profound impact and influence on brain functioning; consequently, a brain impacted by substances will often signal a client—“I need drugs or alcohol to survive”. As a result, families and professionals often experience this “brain influence” in defiant behavior, treatment resistance, and a lack of emotional regulation. Understanding evidenced-based approaches and effective interventions require an understanding of individual client demographics, neurobiology, and family system dynamics. Most of the time, “treatment resistant clients” are the result of frustrated, unwilling, and unprepared professionals.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Evidence-Based Treatment (EBT) Approved

 


PLENARY-C: Concurrent Session Plenary 2 (Monday, 2/19/18)(10:15-11:45am) — Military and Veterans: Where Substance Abuse and PTSD Meet

Speaker: Nyi Myint, MSW, MBA, LCSW, LCAS, CCS

Description: The purpose of this session is to provide an overview of current theories regarding anxiety disorders, specifically trauma and the intersection with addiction in veterans. This session is comprised of three parts. The first section is a discussion of military culture. The second section discusses the origins of trauma and anxiety special consideration is given to Piaget’s model of cognitive development and linear interventions for co-morbidity. The final section concludes with a discussion of the most current Evidence Based Practices (EBP), specifically Cognitive Behavioral, Prolonged Exposure Therapy, and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Substance Use Disorder and Veterans (SUDV), Evidence-Based Treatment (EBT), and Psychopathology (PSY) Approved

**ON TRIGGER WARNING**
There will be some video clips shown of reenactments and actual combat. Videos include profanity, brief nudity, violence, and death. Viewer discretion is advised. An alternate activity is available for those who wish to step out.

PLENARY-D: Luncheon Plenary 3 (Monday, 2/19/18) (12:30-1:30pm) — An Invisible Epidemic: Alcohol Misuse and Abuse Prevention in Older Adults

Speaker: C. Ray Taylor, EdD., LPA

Description: The “invisible epidemic” nature of alcohol abuse and misuse has resulted in under-identified, under-diagnosed, and under-treated among older adults. Emphasis is placed on increasing public awareness, biopsychosocial risk factors including use of medications, tools for identification, and evidence-based intervention. Practical implications are provided for discussing use of alcohol with older adults, their care partners, and professionals.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Substance Use Disorder and the Elderly (SUDE) and Evidence-Based Treatment (EBT) Approved

PLENARY-E: Concurrent Session Plenary 4 (Tuesday, 2/20/18) (10:30-12:00pm) — Yoga & Meditation into Your Practice

Speaker: Alanna Brewton, LCAS

Description: This workshop is designed to help you learn and practice simple breathing techniques and Yoga poses to reduce stress and increase mindfulness. Though we tell and teach our clients relaxing breathing techniques, clinicians are infamous for holding our breath. We hold our breath as we listen to clients’ stories, we wait to exhale when we are uncertain, and our sighs and yawns are audible enough to be heard by others. Mindfulness can be powerful tool to increase our tolerance for painful emotions, enhancing our ability to remain attentive while sitting with suffering. This is important for a therapeutic alliance, because our clients usually express only those feelings they believe we can tolerate hearing. On the other hand, if we’re able to be with a fuller range of experience, this will help our clients do the same.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB General Skill Building (GSB)

PLENARY-F: Concurrent Session Plenary 5 (Tuesday, 2/20/18) (10:30-12:00pm) — Evidence-Based Substance Use Disorder Practices and Techniques

Speaker: Shari Sias, PhD

Description: Evidence-based practices are treatments that are proven effective through outcome-based research. As such, when implemented with consistency, evidence-based practices are likely to be effective in changing target behavior like substance abuse. The goal of this program is to increase attendees’ understanding of evidence-based substance use disorder practices and techniques.  

PLENARY-G: Luncheon Plenary 6 (Tuesday, 2/20/18)(12:30pm – 1:30 pm) — Treating the Criminal Justice Involved Population: They are Not the Same!

Speaker: Mike Torch, MS, LADC

Description: This presentation is an overview which will provide Substance Use Disorder treatment providers with an increased awareness of the Criminogenic needs and barriers encountered in providing treatment to offenders and community reentry populations.

// Session Sponsored By: Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SEATTC) // 


PLENARY-H: Closing Plenary 7 (Wednesday, 2/21/18)(10:30-12:00pm) — Latest Research in Brain Addiction

Speaker: Darryl Inaba, PharmD., CATC-V, CADC III

Description: Breakthroughs in understanding the pharmacology, brain processes, and impact of addiction on individuals vulnerable to develop Substance-Related Addictive Disorders led to passage of the Addiction Equity Act in 2008. Continued investigations find anomalies in those who are predisposed to or who have developed substance use and/or behavioral compulsivity disorders. Expansion of brain imaging techniques and other research tools validate addiction and even its recrudescence (relapse) episodes to be neurobiological variances in the neuro-cellular, neuro-chemical, and neuro-functioning of those who experience addiction. The brain anomalies associated with addictive disorders provide an understanding for why a diverse variety of drugs and behavioral compulsions can develop into addiction in specific individuals. These also help to explain why some are more likely than others to relapse after treatment for their condition.

This closing plenary session will explore the pharmacology, brain anomalies, and impact that addiction has on the brain. How this impacts the treatment and recovery process of Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders will be discussed. It will provide firm validation that addiction is not a moral dysfunction or a will power issue but an actual medical and biological anomaly of the most important organ to human existence, the brain. The presentation is hoped to provide information that will help inspire development of tools to increase better clinical management of addictive disorders to promote long-term sobriety (recovery) that can help prevent further catastrophic consequences that can result from this chronic persistent medical disorder.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Psychopathology (PSY) Approved

// Session Sponsored By: Dominion Diagnostics // 


Main Tracks

 

MAIN-A: Brain Disease with a Relational Solution: Working with Addiction through the Lens of Neuropsychology and Attachment Theory

Level: Intermediate
Presenter: Kelly Wedell, EdS, LPCS

Description: In this main track we will cover the neuroscience of addiction, relational trauma and attachment to formulate a working understanding of how our relationship as substance abuse professionals impacts the recovery efforts of our clients. Research has demonstrated that the therapeutic relationship is the number one predictor of successful outcomes in counseling. During the workshop we will be exploring the power of utilizing transference and counter-transference as a means of fostering attachment repair and promoting secure attachment within our clients. We will learn specific techniques for supporting emotional regulation and incorporating internal resources so that our clients are ready to address potential trauma responses effectively. This workshop promises to be engaging, experiential and collaborative in nature as we take a deep dive into understanding the science behind the therapeutic relationship and practice ways of bringing ourselves to this sacred healing relationship that enhances connection, trust, safety and recovery.


MAIN-B: Working with Adolescents involved in the Juvenile Justice System

Level: Intermediate
Presenter: Mike Torch, MA, LADC

Description: This track will review current perspectives on this very difficult treatment population. Effective treatment techniques and approaches will be presented didactically and experientially. Topics will include: developmentally appropriate Juvenile Justice screening and assessment techniques, biogenetic influences and consequences, neurological functioning and condition progression as well as productive intervention techniques.

// Session Sponsored By: Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SEATTC) // 


MAIN-C: If It’s an Epidemic, Shouldn’t You Use Medication to Treat It? Exploring the Medical Options for Treating Opioid Use Disorder

Level: Intermediate
Presenter: Ed Johnson, M.Ed., MAC, LPC, CCS

Description: Addiction and Opioid Use Disorder are “chronic medical conditions”, however many Addiction Professionals feel the only appropriate treatment is abstinence. The increase in mortality due to the misuse of prescription medications and heroin has caused the field to re-examine the use of medication to treat Opioid Use Disorder. It is also causing Addiction Professionals to reexamine how they define “recovery” and how they define “successful outcomes”. This session explores the specifics of Opioid Use Disorder and discusses all the various medications currently available for its treatment.

// Session Sponsored By: Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SEATTC) //


MAIN-D: Sorting through the Signs and Symptoms: Understanding & Treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Presenter: Jessica Holton, MSW, LCSW, LCAS

Description: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is often overlooked and misdiagnosed. Ninety percent of the population will experience a traumatic event at during their lifetime. Unfortunately, many individuals who exhibit signs and report symptoms that correlate with PTSD are misdiagnosed with Anxiety Disorders, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Personality Disorders, Bipolar Disorder, Depressive Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and/or Psychotic Disorders. Additionally, clinicians and clients alike could be misinformed and reason that PTSD in not treatable.
The presenter will describe the signs and symptoms (according to the DSM 5) the neurobiology of PTSD. The correlation between the symptom of avoidance and substance use will be clarified. The speaker will explain the differential diagnoses and emphasis the importance of a thorough clinical comprehensive assessment. Additionally, effective treatment that is related to the diagnostic criteria and neurobiology of PTSD will be described and practiced.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB General Skill Building Approved 

// Session Sponsored By: Addiction Professionals of North Carolina (APNC) //


MAIN-E: Clinical Supervision: Leading through Serving

Level: All Levels
Presenter: Mike McGuire, LCSW, LCAS, LMFT, CSS, MINT

Description: The increasing complexities of treating substance use disorders generates a high demand for qualified clinicians and clinical supervisors. Join us as we explore a wide variety of topics essential to successful supervision. We got it all: DSM & ASAM updates, 12 Core Functions, ethical decision-making, research, principles of effective leadership, Feedback Informed Treatment, risk management, the science of implementation, and self-care. Expect an informative, useful, and unusually fresh experience while you gain the knowledge, skills, and continuing education hours necessary to propel your career forward. Dress comfortably, roll-up your sleeves, and share in a conversation with your colleagues about what has worked, what has not worked, and what now.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Clinical Supervision (CSS) Approved. 

// Session Sponsored By: Behavioral Health Springboard //


MAIN-F: Developments in Addiction Treatment (MAT, Relapse Abatement)

Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Presenter: Darryl S. Inaba, PharmD., CATC-V CADC III

Description: Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT), Maintenance pharmacotherapy, replacement therapies, chemically assisted detoxification or recovery; agonist mediated “anti-priming” treatments, pharmacologic restoration of neuro-homeostasis, addiction vaccines, pharmacogenomics and genetic treatment – “resetting” the addicted brain. Such terms would have been incomprehensible or even oxymoronic to the recovery field just a few short years ago. Recent advances in understanding and acceptance of addiction as a chronic persistent medical disorder resulting from anomalous neurocellular, neurochemical and neurofunctional elements of vulnerable individuals has resulted in an explosive growth of clinical and medical treatment resources targeted to address both the cortical (conscious) and the sub-cortical (instinctive) brain processes involved in addiction. This presentation will review the current developments in addiction treatment as well as the challenges to sustain continued abstinence. The current science of addiction as a chronic persistent brain disorder and its causes will be reviewed. Evidenced-based screening, assessment, intervention and monitoring tools will be presented. FDA approved medications as well as current “off-label” use of other medications that mitigate withdrawal or minimize cravings for specific drug addictions will be discussed. Treatment outcomes and elements found to improve outcome rates will be discussed.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Evidence-Based Treatment (EBT) Approved.

// Session Sponsored By: Dominion Diagnostics //


MAIN-G: Youth Mental Health First Aid and Other Promising Prevention Programs

Level: Introductory/Basic
Presenter: Dawn Cambridge Johnson, M.A., PMP

Description: Participants will learn about best practice prevention programs and strategies for suicide prevention and mental health promotion. During this three day course, participants will complete the full Youth Mental Health First Aid certifications designed to teach and empowered youth serving adults and health care professionals how to help an adolescent (age 12-18) who is experiencing a mental health or addictions challenge or is in crisis. Youth Mental Health First Aid is primarily designed for adults who regularly interact with young people. The course introduces common mental health challenges for youth, reviews typical adolescent development, and teaches a 5-step action plan for how to help young people in both crisis and non-crisis situations. Topics covered include anxiety, depression, substance use, disorders in which psychosis may occur, disruptive behavior disorders (including AD/HD), and eating disorders.

*Only NCSAPPB General Skill Building Credit (GSB) Offered for this Session –  NO Other Credit Available.

// Session Sponsored By: NC DHHS DMHDDSAS Section of Community Wellness, Prevention and Health Integration //


Mini Tracks

 

MINI-A: Opioid Misuse and Older Adults: A Community Crisis

Presenters: Joyce Massey-Smith, MPA; Sarah Potter, MA

Description: Join us for an interactive discussion on the impacts of opioid misuse and abuse on older adults and their families. During the session we will discuss the effects of opioid misuse on vulnerable adults, available resources to prevent problems before they start, and best practices for treatment. A major focus will be on the importance of community partnerships in addressing this complex and devastating crisis.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Substance Use Disorder and the Elderly (SUDE) Approved

// Session Sponsored By: NC-DHHS/Office of Community Policy… // 


MINI-B: Infectious Disease Risks

Presenter: Beverly Hill, RN

Description: The substance abuser is uniquely more at risk of infectious diseases. These diseases can interfere with the process of recovery affecting not only the client but others. The counselor can play a key role in assisting the client in treatment. This track will explore the role of the counselor as well as the reason clients are more at risk and why identification of these diseases is critical to SUD treatment. It will take a look at the common infectious diseases (including HIV) among the substance abusing population, how they are transmitted, why they are more prevalent, explore their treatment as well as its benefits and risks. 

CREDIT: NCSAPPB HIV Approved

// Session Sponsored By: Dominion Diagnostics // 


MINI-C: Ethical Dilemmas in the Digital Age

Presenter: Ed Johnson, M.Ed., MAC, LPC, CCS

Description: Social Networking Sites, Text Messages, Google, Email and the Internet; these digital media have become ubiquitous in the everyday life of Behavioral Health Professionals and the people they serve. How to incorporate these into Professional Ethics were not covered when the majority of Behavioral Health Professionals were in Graduate School, and they open up multiple issues with respect to self-disclosure and professional boundaries. This didactic and experiential training will allow participants to gain an increased understanding of the dynamics of these various digital media and how to safely navigate them in a Professional and Personal setting. 

CREDIT: Approved for NBCC, CHES, & NCSAPPB Ethics Specific  (NOT Approved for CRCC Ethics)

*An additional .5 hour of NCSAPPB credit is available for participants needing 4 hours ethics – must complete additional assignment.

// Session Sponsored By: Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SEATTC) // 


MINI-D: Prescription Drug Use: Challenges of the Generation Gap

Presenter: Darryl S. Inaba, PharmD., CATC-V, CADC III

Description: A National State of Emergency has been declared for the opioid epidemic in the U.S. This crisis originated with increased prescribing of more potent prescription opioids and now expanded to a flood or illicit “designer opioids” flooding on to our streets. Diversion and abuse of opioids and other prescription depressants, stimulants and some even used as psychedelics now challenge illicit substance abuse in annual surveys on drugs abused by adolescents and result in more unintended overdose deaths each year than those caused by auto accidents or guns! All addictive psychoactive prescription and even some “over the counter” (non-prescription medications) contribute to this current problem but most deaths occur from prescription and other opioid pain. The U.S. comprises only 4.6% of the world population yet consumes 80% of the world’s opioid medication and almost all the global hydrocodone supply. Psychoactive prescription drugs are essentially stimulants, depressants or psychedelics (“Uppers, Downers, All Arounders”) like illicit drugs of abuse. This presentation will explore the current trends in abuse of prescription drugs to investigate their pharmacology, toxicology, and addiction liability. How prescription drug abuse complicate diagnosis and treatment of addiction and other mental health disorders will also be examined. Special attention will be paid to the evolving science of Pain and Addiction. This co morbidity is finally being recognized as a major challenge in field of addiction and its treatment.

// Session Sponsored By: Dominion Diagnostics // 


MINI-E: Mindfulness and SUD: Why and How Mindfulness Can Reach the Unreachable

Presenter: Maggie Minsk, LPC, NCC

Description: Learn why the use and teaching of mindfulness has been quickly infiltrating and richly benefiting the treatment of those with substance abuse and dependence issues. Mindfulness has long been included in the skills training portion of DBT (Dialectical Behavior Therapy) programs, which consists of teaching the seven primary mindfulness skills: the Wise Mind, the “what” skills and the “how” skills. Learn why these skills are so important to teach to those with SUD and how to structure the learning of these skills within an undeniable context of science, success, and self-empowerment.

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Evidence-Based Treatment (EBT) Approved.


MINI-F: Drugs of Abuse – Drug Trends

Presenter: Ann Hamlin, BS, MS

Description: The presentation will focus on common drugs of abuse in North Carolina and elsewhere. A description of each drug and the effects of each drug, as well as how to recognize paraphernalia associated with each type of drug, will be thoroughly discussed. As a Forensic Drug Chemist, the presenter worked in the Drug Chemistry section of the NC State Bureau of Investigation for the past 28 years and has assisted the NC General Assembly for the past 12 years on controlled substances matters. The dangers of fentanyl and their analogs will be also be presented along with the most current drug trends making their way across North Carolina.


MINI-G: Silos to Synergy: What You Need to Know about ‘Whole-Person’ Integrated Treatment

Presenter: Britta M. Starke, LCSW, LCAS, CCS

Description: We will begin with brief open dialogue about individual and collective experiences in current behavioral healthcare provision, and the advantages, disadvantages, costs, and benefits of our current framework. This course will provide participants with the knowledge and information about the direction of Behavioral Health integration across systems. We will discuss the key components of Integration and the collaborative care model. Participants should leave feeling like they have a picture of how to prepare for new roles. We will discuss the most recent data regarding the effectiveness of integrated behavioral health, and importance of the roles of LCSW’s, LCAS’s, CCS’s, etc.


MINI-H: Effective Clinical Supervision: Intentionally Utilizing Supervision- Specific Approaches, Models and Interventions

Presenter: Jessica Holton, MSW, LCSW, LCAS

Description: It has been stated that clinicians will repeat the mistakes of their supervisors. Thus, it is essential to offer clinical supervision with intention. Clinical supervision sessions must offer effective guidance and training to associate practitioners.
The presenter will offer examples of clinical supervision approaches, models and interventions. Participants will discover and discuss their experiences and develop clinical supervision approaches, models and interventions to assist in ensuring that newer clinicians will repeat the desirable actions of their supervisors. 

CREDIT: NCSAPPB Clinical Supervision (CSS) Approved

*An additional .5 hour of NCSAPPB credit is available for participants needing 4 hours – must complete additional assignment.

// Session Sponsored By: Addiction Professionals of North Carolina (APNC) // 


Evening Sessions

 

EVENING-A: Sunday Evening Session, 2/18/18 (7:30-8:30pm) Open AA Meeting

Facilitator: David W.

Description: This session will focus on “Understanding Anonymity and Misconceptions”. How does one maintain their own recovery while working in the recovery field and problems they may have encountered? Attendees in recovery share information and learn from each others’ experiences. A primary purpose of the meeting is to share personal experiences as well as up to date and useful information to help those in recovery.

*Only NCSAPPB Credit Available for this Session — NO Other Credit Available.

EVENING-B: Sunday Evening Session, 2/18/18 (7:30-8:30pm) NA Meeting

Facilitator: Cameron L.

Description: This session will focus on: What is Narcotics Anonymous? How you can reach us. What we can do to help. A couple of us will give our experience of strength and hope.

*Only NCSAPPB Credit Available for this Session — NO Other Credit Available.

EVENING-C: Monday Evening Session, 2/19/18 (7:30-9:30pm) “Memo to Self” (Film & Discussion)

Facilitator: Tony Beatty, MA, LCAS, CCS

Description: Addiction is a potentially fatal illness – but it is also eminently recoverable. Certain professionals struggling with substance use disorders enjoy phenomenal success rates getting through early sobriety and into long-term remission of their addiction problems. What do they do? And what can we learn from them?

In this film, Dr. Kevin McCauley re-lives his own precarious early sobriety – negotiating hazards such as hostile prosecutors, treatment programs with divided loyalties, and his own craving brain. Following the advice of the Addiction Medicine experts who helped him, he replicates the sobriety habits and success of recovering pilots and health care professionals. By framing addiction not as a problem of moral choice but as a safety/risk management challenge, Dr. McCauley explains how recovery is neither rare nor random – with the right kind of support, it can even be expected.
This film will prove a valuable tool for therapists, counselors, recovery coaches and clinicians to introduce audiences to the concepts and practices of Recovery Management, and for people in early recovery and their families learning how to survive the first year of sobriety.

EVENING-D: Tuesday Evening Session, 2/20/18 (7:30-9:30pm) “Paper Tigers” (Film & Discussion)

Facilitator: Donald McDonald, MSW, LCAS

Description: Paper Tigers follows a year in the life of an alternative high school that has radically changed its approach to disciplining its students, becoming a promising model for how to break the cycles of poverty, violence and disease that affect families. “Stressed brains can’t learn.” – That was the nugget of neuroscience that Jim Sporleder, principal of a high school riddled with violence, drugs and truancy, took away from an educational conference in 2010. Three years later, the number of fights at Lincoln Alternative High School had gone down by 75% and the grad-uation rate had increased five-fold. Paper Tigers is the story of how one school made such dramatic progress. Following six students over the course of a school year, we see Lincoln’s staff try a new approach to discipline: one based on understanding and treatment rather than judgment and suspension. Using a combination of vérité and revealing diary cam footage, Paper Tigers is a testament to what the latest developmental science is showing: that just one caring adult can help break the cycle of adversity in a young person’s life.


Winter School 2018 Curriculum Credit Information

The Winter School has been designed to serve the needs of many professional groups. All types of school credit are included in the school cost. All choice(s) of credit must be indicated on the registration form during the pre-registration period.

North Carolina Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board (NCSAPPB) Credit

Application for approval has been made to the North Carolina Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board for up to 27 Substance Abuse Specific hours.

 


Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) Credit

The North Carolina Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies (NCFADS) has been approved by CRCC for up to 26 hours for Winter School 2018 for CRC, CRC-MAC and CRC-CS.

 


Contact Hours

Certificates reflecting up to 26 hours of Education will be awarded for Social Workers, Marriage/Family Therapists, and Nurses.

*Nurses, if you have questions about nursing credit, please contact the North Carolina Board of Nursing at (919) 782-3211.

 


National Board Certified Counselors (NBCC) Credit

The North Carolina Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies (NCFADS) has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP no. 5673. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. NCFADS is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. As a minimum, each individual schedule must be comprised of a curriculum Main Track representing 11 hours. Participants must attend all track classes to receive the 11 hour track maximum. NBCC is also appropriate for those seeking LPC credits.

         

Public School Personnel Renewal Credit (PSPR)

Certificates for up to 26 contact hours of education will awarded upon completion of the School.

 


Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES®) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES®)

Sponsored by NCFADS, a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES®) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES®) to receive up to 26 total Category I contact education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours available are 26.

 

 


Continuing Education Units (CEU)

Certificates for up to 26 contact hours / 2.6 Continuing Education Credits (CEU’s) will be awarded upon completion of the School..

*Most professionals do not need the CEU, but only require contact hours or specialty credit (listed above). UNCW provides CEU’s for the Schools.

Curriculum Credit Information

Appropriate credit for the Winter School will be awarded after eligibility has been determined from attendance records and in conjunction with the above stated attendance requirements.

*Monday evening extra credit sessions only approved for NCSAPPB credits.

**Please note that not all sessions are approved by every credentialing board. Check individual session information for limited exclusions.

Special Thanks to our 2018 NCFADS Winter School Sponsors

ATTC

Special Thanks to our 2018 NCFADS Winter School Exhibitors

  • Dominion Diagnostics
  • Behavioral Health Springboard
  • SEATTC
  • Alcoholics Anonymous
  • Narcotics Anonymous
  • Blanchard Addiction Resources
  • Addiction Professionals of North Carolina

MORE COMING SOON…

Embassy Suites, Greensboro, NCOfficial Hotel of NCFADS Winter School 2018:
Embassy Suites Greensboro, NC

The NCFADS Board chose the Embassy Suites as its 2018 Winter School site because it offers such great meeting rooms as well as excellent accommodations for those who need housing. The number of available rooms will meet our enrollment needs quite well and the negotiated price for participant housing is outstanding.

The Embassy Suites is located in the center of the Triad, just 6 miles from the Piedmont Triad International Airport at the intersection of Interstate 40 and Highway 68. They are the premier center for hospitality in the area, with a full range of services to meet every traveler’s needs. The 219, all-suite property has an elegant 7-story atrium where the fresh scent of lush greenery fills the senses. Water cascades from a luxurious fountain and sunlight radiates through the skylights overhead.

Each suite is beautifully decorated with a private bedroom and spacious living room. All of the suites have a refrigerator, microwave oven, individual cup coffee maker, two flat screen televisions, two telephones, high speed Internet and a very functional dining/work table with ergonomic chair. Choose a suite with 2 double beds or 1 king bed; in addition each suite is equipped with a queen size sleeper sofa for extra guests.

Since the NCFADS fee does NOT include housing, special daily rates of $110.00 + tax (Single Room, King, Non-Smoking), and $110 + tax (Two Double Beds, Non-Smoking) [Yes! It’s the same price regardless of a King or Dbl Beds], have been negotiated with the Embassy Suites. This room rate includes breakfast on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings, plus a complimentary reception Sunday, Monday & Tuesday evenings.

All lodging/housing arrangements must be made directly with the Embassy Suites no later than January 27, 2018!

Please call 336-668-4535 to make your hotel reservation.

NOTE:  IF the Embassy Suites is full, additional rooms may be available at the Homewood Suites next door.  Please contact Homewood Suites to make your reservation.

Special Thanks to Our 2018 NCFADS Winter School Sponsors

Support NCFADS by Sponsoring the 2018 Winter School

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Info About Sponsoring the 2018 NCFADS Winter School

Register for the 2018 NCFADS Winter School

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Attend for as Low as $130!