2016 NCFADS Summer School: July 25-29th


July 25 – 29th | University of North Carolina at Wilmington, NC (UNCW)

The NC Foundation for Alcohol & Drug Studies is pleased to present the 2016 Summer School, July 25th through the 29th at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, NC. We are honored to have this year’s faculty filled with nationally known speakers, researchers and leaders in the field.

Ready to register?  Click here to register for Summer School

NCFADS School
 

The Foundation is pleased to present the 40th North Carolina Summer School for Alcohol and Drug Studies.  The school schedule and format feature an emphasis on in-depth study and a setting designed to enhance learning and create a spirit of “community” for all participants.

The Summer School is designed to serve the needs of various persons working in the field of chemical dependency as well as educators and health care professionals. Outstanding faculty possessing excellent credentials and expertise will present a variety of study tracks.

Be sure to join us for the festivities as we celebrate our 40th Anniversary throughout our Winter and Summer Schools.

NCFADS School Class     NCFADS School Exhibitor     NCFADS School Team
 

Conference Schedule

CLICK HERE to Download a Campus Map

Monday, July 25, 2016


10:00 – 12:00 p.m. — Registration & Check-In

12:00 – 3:00 p.m. — Opening-Speaker & Lunch Session D100: “Grandma’s In The Sauce Again” with Gerald Shulman

3:00 – 3:15 p.m. — Break

3:15 – 5:30 p.m. — General Plenary D200: Beyond Anger & Violence: A Program for Women with Twyla Wilson

7:15 – 8:15 p.m. — Extra Credit Sessions

E100: AA Open Meeting-SUDS: Sad, Under the Influence, Desperate, Sober

E200: AlaNon Meeting

E300: NA Meeting-How Narcotics Anonymous can help, and how someone can find NA

Tuesday, July 26, 2016


7:00 – 7:45 a.m. — Breakfast in Wagoner Hall

9:00 – 10:00 a.m. — Mini-Tracks

Session B201: So, You Want To Get Credentialed?

Session B202: Pain and Addiction: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies for Diagnosing and Treating Both Conditions

Session B203: HIV/AIDS: What We Know Now

Session B204: DWI Services for Individuals with DWI Offenses-Update

Session B205: Double Trouble: Assessing & Treating Co-Occurring Disorders Using the DSM-5

Session B206: Healing Trauma: Strategies for Women

Session B207: Creative Therapeutic Expression

Session B208: Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction

Session B209: If Addiction is a Chronic Medical Condition, How Come I’m Not In a Doctor’s Office

Session B210: You CAN Be Sober in College: An Overview of Collegiate Recovery

Session B211: Advocacy 101

Session B212: A Multi-Faceted Approach to Cravings Management

10:00 – 10:15 a.m. — Break

10:15 – 12:30 a.m. — Mini-Tracks (Continued)

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. — Lunch

1:45 – 5:15 p.m. — Concurrent Plenary Tracks

Session C401: The Opioid Crisis and MAT

Session C402: Overview of PTSD & Veteran’s Issues

Session C403: Current Trends with Drugs of Abuse

Session C404: Domestic Violence

Session C405: The New & Revised ASAM Criteria

Session C406: Why Gender Matters: Creating Services for Women & Girls

3:00 p.m. — Break

7:15 – 9:15 p.m. — Extra Credit Evening Session

E400: The Hungry Heart Film and Discussion

Wednesday, July 27, 2016


7:00 – 7:45 a.m. — Breakfast in Wagoner Hall

9:00 – 10:00 a.m. — Main Track Sessions

Session A001. The Basics: A Practical Approach To Therapy With The Chemically Dependent Person

Session A002: Advanced Creative Group Skills

Session A003: Clinical Supervision Enthusiasm Infusion: Advanced Skills

Session A004: Process Addictions: Changing the Scope of Addictions Counseling

Session A005: Cannabis & Other Drugs. Part I: Cannabis Use Disorder: The Much Under-Appreciated Addiction and the new science of Marijuana; Part II: Current Trends with Drugs of Abuse: New Faces on the Usual Suspects

Session A006: Worlds Apart: What Works in Adolescent Treatment and Why

Session A007: Problem Gambling Training Summit: Research Updates and Clinical Best Practices

Session A008: Stacked Deck

Session A009: Using the ASAM & DSM Criteria Throughout the Treatment Process

Session A010: The Power of the Subject Matter Expert: How to Empower Your Community

Session A011: Substance Abuse, Combat Trauma & Returning OEF/OIF Veterans

10:00 – 10:15 p.m. — Break

10:15 – 12:30 p.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

12:30 – 1:30 p.m. — Lunch

1:45 – 5:15 p.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

3:15 – 3:30 p.m. — Break

3:30 – 5:30 p.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

7:15 – 8:15 p.m. — Extra Credit Sessions

E500: Video & Discussion: Cannabinyzed: Physical and Mental Effects of Marijuana

E600:Video & Discussion: Understanding the Biology of Desire: Personal Journey of Ice Cream Addiction and Recovery from Cancer

Thursday, July 28, 2016


7:00 – 7:45 a.m. — Breakfast in Wagoner Hall

8:00 – 10:00 a.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

10:00 – 10:15 p.m. — Break

10:15 – 12:30 a.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

12:00 – 1:30 p.m. — Lunch

Friday, July 29, 2016


7:00 – 7:45 a.m. — Breakfast in Wagoner Hall

8:00 – 10:00 a.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

10:00 – 10:15 p.m. — Break

10:15 – 12:30 p.m. — Main Track Sessions (Continued)

12:00 – 1:30 p.m. — Lunch & Plenary:

D300: Addicted to Addiction

Main Tracks

 

A001. The Basics: A Practical Approach To Therapy With The Chemically Dependent Person (15 hrs.)

Level: Basic
Facilitator: James A. (Al) Greene, MSW, LCAS, CCS
Description: This course will provide participants with a nuts-and-bolts overview of treatment and recovery issues from intake/assessment to late-stage recovery. Participants will learn practical treatment interventions through early, middle and late-stage recovery, emphasizing four levels of helper interventions. Emphasis will be given to addiction-related issues such as denial, resistance, grief and relapse. This course is especially suitable for relative newcomers and for experienced counselors interested in a review of basic concepts.

 


A002. Advanced Creative Group Skills (15 hrs.)

Level: Advanced
Facilitator: Geri Miller, Ph.D., LCAS, LPC, CCS
Description: This course is designed to provide participants with both theoretical and practical information about group counseling. The course will be equally divided into knowledge of group development and experiential activities. Special emphasis will be given during the training on motivational interviewing approaches and techniques.

 


A003. Clinical Supervision Enthusiasm Infusion: Advanced Skills  (15 hrs.)

Level: Advanced
Facilitator: Alan Lyme, LCSW, ICADC, ICCS
Description: So you’ve passed the initial hurdle: you’ve either been credentialed as a clinical supervisor or you just want to have a refresher course to keep your skills current. This fifteen hour course is for you: it fulfills the training requirements for re-credentialing in your state and provides you advanced knowledge and skills in supervision. This course covers advanced models of supervision, including Powell’s blended model, technology use in supervision, the Critical Reflection model, new ethical dilemmas in the digital age, and how to structure supervision for the individual growth and learning needs of supervisees.

 


A004. Process Addictions: Changing the Scope of Addictions Counseling (15 hrs.)

Facilitator: Ellen Elliott, NCC, LCAS, LPC, CCS, CSAT
Level: Basic
Description: Addictions counseling has changed drastically over the years. Old models have come and gone making way for scientific breakthroughs in the field that continue to change the way we treat addictions. The modalities have changed and now, the scope of the field itself is changing. Sex and food addictions, gambling and spending, and now even gaming and internet addictions are gaining notoriety as legitimate disorders for addictions counselors to add to the list of issues to address in treatment. Once considered compulsive behaviors, the evidence related to brain changes and genetic vulnerability is growing, but how prepared are we to provide clients who struggle with multiple addictions with the treatment they need? This workshop will help counselors prepare for the changing world of addictions by providing screening tools for identifying process addictions and information related to best treatment practices. Specific strategies for managing and treating multiple addictions in a substance abuse setting will be presented as well as information related to referral sources, specialized training, and educational materials available for various behavioral addictions.


A005. Cannabis & Other Drugs. Part I: Cannabis Use Disorder: The Much Under-Appreciated Addiction and the new science of Marijuana; Part II: Current Trends with Drugs of Abuse: New Faces on the Usual Suspects (# hrs.)

Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Facilitators: Darryl S. Inaba, PharmD. CADC III
Description: Part I: Cannabis Use Disorder: A Much Under-appreciated Addiction and the New Science of MarijuanaOregon, Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Washington DC have now legalized marijuana for recreational use and 23 states plus the District of Columbia have approved medical use of marijuana. This despite the fact that: no major medical organization endorses crude marijuana as medicine, pot is still a federal Schedule I substance of abuse, and a growing body of medical evidence that demonstrate marijuana (THC) especially in its newer highly potent forms (“edibles and BHO”), and the new synthetic cannabinoids (“Spice”) result in addiction, medical and mental health problems. This presentation will look at marijuana as a drug: It’s medical and abuse potential relative to other psychoactive substances. It will revisit its botany, chemistry, pharmacology, impact on the adolescent brain and especially the 8-9% of its users who develop Cannabis Use Disorder. The potential medical benefits of marijuana will also be perused.
Part II: Current Trends with Drugs of Abuse: New Faces on the Usual Suspects
Discoveries of new abusable Phytochemicals and synthetic designer drugs molecules along with the continued proliferation of diverted prescription and OTC medications creates a significant challenge to the recognition and treatment of current drug abuse and addiction problems. “Spice, Bath Salts, Benzo Fury, Flakka, Kratom, Salvia, 2C-I” and many other substances have recently exploded within the drug abusing subculture with severe adverse consequences. Despite their mystique, all can be generally viewed as being CNS stimulants, depressants or psychedelics: AKA – Uppers, Downers, All Arounders. This presentation will explore these trends then provide an update on what is known about their pharmacology and toxicology. How they complicate diagnosis and treatment of addiction and mental health disorders will also be explored. Modification of molecules to circumvent detection and legal sanctions is almost infinite. Designer Drug modifications will be defined and explained.
(Sponsored by: Dominion Diagnostics)

 


A006. Worlds Apart: What Works in Adolescent Treatment and Why (15 hrs.)

Level: Intermediate
Instructors: James E. Campbell, MA, LPCI, CACII
Description: Adolescent treatment is not for the faint of heart. In fact, adolescents can sometimes seem like they come from an altogether different world; and, in a sense, they do. Still, many of us choose the amazing, rewarding work of seeking to engage them in treatment and introduce them to a life of recovery. We know that the rewards of working with adolescents can be rich. Could there be some way to navigate the risks of serving this population while drawing out the best in them? What if we, as counselors, could be proactive in charting a course with those we serve that would be more effective in leading them to a healthier future? What if what many consider to be liabilities are actually carefully disguised opportunities and, potentially, strengths?
There has been a wealth of research and recent discoveries about adolescent development and learning in recent years. Unfortunately, there is frequently a disconnect between what we know works with adolescents and the treatment modalities we use when working with them. We cling to outdated paradigms and then cringe when they prove less than effective. This session briefly reviews some of the most important discoveries related to adolescent development and then explores how to best apply that knowledge to design and implement effective treatment strategies for engaging and working with adolescents and their families. Come join us as we learn to effectively navigate adolescence and learn to work more effectively in prevention, treatment and intervention for those we serve!
(Sponsored by: SEATTC)

 


A007. Problem Gambling Training Summit: Research Updates and Clinical Best Practices (15 hrs.)

Level: Intermediate/Advanced
Instructors: Jenny Opels, LCPC, CEAP, SAP, PCGC, ICCGC; & David Ledgerwood, PhD
Description: Designed especially for the North Carolina Problem Gambling Program Network of Treatment Providers, this track will provide participants with opportunities to learn about Gambling Disorder & Other Addictive Disorders, Treatment Effectiveness, Increasing Admissions, Special Populations and Mobile Gaming & Fantasy Sports. This track offers full scholarships; however, priority will be given to clinicians listed on the Problem Gambling Registry and those that have previously attended a problem gambling track or Sure Bet training. If you are interested in enrolling, you must receive prior approval from Smith Worth at the NC Division of MHDDSAS (smith.worth@dhhs.nc.gov). All scholarships are subject to the availability of funds.
(Sponsored by: NCPGP & NCDMHDDSAS)

 


A008. Stacked Deck (15 hrs.)

Level: Basic
Instructors: Ashley Trantham, MA; & Aaron Stevens, LPC, PCGC
Description: Participants will have hands on experience and knowledge in how to effectively implement the Stacked Deck curriculum. Stacked Deck is an evidence-based program designed to prevent problem gambling in grades 9-12; however, has been in grades 7 & 8. Stacked Deck is listed on SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. Stacked Deck is intended to change attitudes towards gambling based on the premise that attitudes are best predictors for behavior. It increases knowledge about gambling and the odds of winning. It corrects beliefs about gambling. And finally, it prevents or decreases the frequency of gambling behavior. Up to 30 full scholarships will be awarded to participants. Priority will be given to school administrators, principals, teachers, after-school programs and community prevention specialists. Those interested in enrolling must receive prior approval from Smith Worth at the NC Division of MHDDSAS (smith.worth@dhhs.nc.gov). All scholarships are subject to the availability of funds.
(Sponsored by: NCPGP & NCDMHDDSAS)

 


A009. Using the ASAM & DSM Criteria Throughout the Treatment Process (15 hrs.)

Level: Basic
Facilitator: Gerald Shulman, M.A., M.A.C., FACATA
Description: This workshop will begin with a discussion of the DSM-5 focusing on Substance Use and Addictive Disorders and the interrelationship between substance use and mental health disorders. Use of the ASAM Criteria from the point of intake/assessment though placement to discharge and referral for continuing care. This system will illustrate: (1) the assessment process; (2) the development of a problem list organized by priority based on severity and risk; (3) the “batching” of patient problems; (4) the development of measurable, behavioral and achievable treatment plans; (5) what constitutes appropriate, meaningful clinical progress notes related to individual treatment plan objectives and; (6) a coding system which forces tight linkages between the assessment problems identified, treatment plan goals and objectives and the clinical progress notes. Case studies will be used to demonstrate appropriate and inappropriate documentation at all points along the process.
(Sponsored by: McLeod Addictive Disease Center)

 


A010. The Power of the Subject Matter Expert: How to Empower Your Community (15 hrs.)

Level: Basic
Facilitators: Jessica Dicken, MSW; & Felicia Roberson, MA
Description: This session will assist you in connecting with current coalitions and groups to assess their readiness to collaborate, exploring meaningful ways to work together to increase the reach of ATOD prevention as well as building your skills as an ATOD prevention subject matter expert. You will also practice facilitating conversations and managing relationships between coalition/group members and community leaders. A panel of experts will conclude the workshop by sharing tips for successful collaborations and lessons learned relating to empowering communities to affect change.
(Sponsored by: Division of MH/DD/SAS, CPM/Office of Prevention)

 


A011. Substance Abuse, Combat Trauma & Returning OEF/OIF Veteran (15 hrs.)

Level: Basic
Facilitators: Nyi Myint, MSW, MBA, LCSWA, LCASA
Description: This topic will focus on suicide among military veterans. Substance abuse and suicide are closely linked and these issues have particular relevance to service members, veterans and their families. What aspects of military culture and service contribute to the problem? What aspects serve a protective function? Why do people kill themselves and how is the military addressing the current high rates of suicide? This workshop will update clinicians on the most recent research on suicide and its relationship to substance abuse, especially among service members and veterans.

 


Mini Tracks

 

B201. So, You Want To Get Credentialed? (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitators: Danny Graves, LCAS, CCS; Mark Crabtree, LCAS CCS,& Tony Beatty, LCAS CCS
Description: The North Carolina Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board Forum session will include a discussion on the history of the Board and the application requirements for initial credentialing and renewal of credentials.
(Sponsored by: NCSAPPB)

 


B202. Pain and Addiction: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies for Diagnosing and Treating Both Conditions (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitator: John Femino, MD, FASAM, MRO
Description: Addiction therapists often listen to their patients complain of pain and are unsure if the complaints represent a true pain disorder, under-treatment of pain because of tolerance and physical dependence, or drug seeking behavior. Referral to a primary care physician or medical specialists for assistance often results in prescription medication being approved for treatment without consideration of the addict’s recovery status or underlying motives.

This course will review the biology of pain transmission and the risk of addiction when using opioids for treating chronic pain. Participants will review the assessment strategies and treatment protocol that compares the pain complaints to the timing course of opioid withdrawal, utilizing commonly available pain and withdrawal scales. Examples of commonly prescribed medications for the treatment of pain will be reviewed, with emphasis on the use of buprenorphine (Suboxone) as a clinical tool for management of patients with both conditions.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: Dominion Diagnostics)

 


B203. HIV/AIDS: What We Know Now (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitator: Shannon Warren
Description: Gain a deeper understanding of what we know now about HIV/AIDS, how the use of specific substances makes a person more or less likely to get infected with HIV, ways that new research has changed the way we think about and implement HIV prevention, and ways to find resources in your area to assist HIV+ clients get help, and assist HIV- clients to stay negative.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: Carolinas CARE Partnership)

 


B204. DWI Services for Individuals with DWI Offenses-Update (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitator: Lynn Jones, LPC, LCAS, DWI Services Program Manager
Description: This session is primarily for seasoned authorized DWI services providers. It will be an update on practices related to the delivery of substance use disorder services for individuals with DWI offenses. We will also highlight national trends and the latest research on substance use disorders. We will review the Best Practice Standards to include use of the “Placement Decisions” worksheet that incorporates DSM5 and DWI law/rules.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: DWI Services – Division of MH/DD/SAS)

 


B205. Double Trouble: Assessing & Treating Co-Occurring Disorders Using the DSM-5 (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitator: Martha Early, Ph.D., LCSW, LCAS
Description: People with mental health disorders are more likely than people without mental health disorders to experience a substance use or other addictive disorder. Due to a complex array of symptoms it can be difficult to diagnose the co-occurring disorders and in many cases clients receive treatment for one disorder while the other goes untreated. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM 5) comes with numerous changes to the way in which we recognize and describe mental health and substance abuse disorders. One of the more distinct areas of change is in the category of the substance-related and addictive disorders. A thorough and complete bio-psycho-social assessment will allow for more correct diagnosing of mental health and substance abuse disorders.


B206. Healing Trauma: Strategies for Women (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitator: Twyla Wilson, LCSW, ACSW
Description: This interactive training is based on the concept and values of trauma-informed services. It also presents a new five-session trauma curriculum for women who have been abused. The focus is on the core things that both staff and clients need: an understanding of what trauma is, its process, and its impact on both the inner self (thoughts, feelings, beliefs, values) and the outer self (behavior and relationships). Workshop topics include: the process of trauma, power and abuse, grounding and self-soothing, and healthy relationships. Healing Trauma (HT) is an adaptation of the widely used, evidence-based Beyond Trauma: A Healing Journey for Women. It is particularly designed for settings requiring a shorter intervention: jails, domestic violence agencies, and sexual assault services. The program materials consist of a facilitator guide and participant workbook which are on a CD-Rom to allow for easy duplication. The workbook is written in both English and Spanish.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: Magnolia Landing)

 


B207. Creative Therapeutic Expression (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitator: William Faulkner
Description:

 


B208. Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitators: Gerald Shulman, M.A., M.A.C., FACATA
Description: This workshop will begin with information about relapse rates with patients who are addicted to various mood-changing substances and how the treatment field has fallen far short of their goals for patients. A model integrating psychosocial treatment, recovery support services and pharmacotherapy will be presented as a way to enhance treatment outcome and recovery. Current FDA approved medications for the treatment of opioid, alcohol and nicotine dependence will be presented with the benefits and disadvantages of each. Integration of pharmacotherapy with psychosocial treatment will be discussed included relationship to treatment planning including the patient who agrees to pharmacotherapy but refuses psychosocial treatment. The controversies about the use of pharmacotherapy in general and as applied with particular medications will be discussed. Case studies will be used.

 


B209. If Addiction is a Chronic Medical Condition, How Come I’m Not In a Doctor’s Office (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitators: Ed Johnson
Description: If Addiction is a Chronic Disease are our treatment and prevention efforts and the language we use the same as those for other chronic diseases? If not what needs to change and why? This presentation will explore these issues and challenge attendees to view addiction treatment and prevention and our everyday language from a different perspective that research shows improves outcomes and reduces stigma.
(Sponsored by: SEATTC)

 


B210. You CAN Be Sober in College: An Overview of Collegiate Recovery (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitators: Frank Allison; & Aimee Hourigan, M.Ed
Description: This course will provide participants with an overview of collegiate recovery and how to help clients include education in their plans for life after treatment. Participants will learn about maintaining recovery in the abstinence-hostile college environment, what is included (and not included) in a typical collegiate recovery program, and what is available at campuses in North Carolina. Emphasis will be given to sharing experiences of students in recovery and discussion of how this movement is breaking down stigma related to addiction and recovery.
(Sponsored by: Recovery Initiatives, UNCCH)

 


B211. Advocacy 101 (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitators: Mark Ezzell
Description: During this session we’ll discuss advocacy strategies that addiction professionals can use to begin to work toward influencing and implementing policies that affect substance use disorder consumers, professionals and families. We’ll learn the differences between policies, procedures and laws; ways to identify decision makers and motivate them to become partners in your efforts; present the concepts of education, advocacy and lobbying and identify the differences; and share strategies to help make you a more effective advocate in your community.
(Sponsored by: APNC)

 


B212. A Multi-Faceted Approach to Cravings Management (3.25 hrs.)

Facilitators: Doug Paul, MS, LPC
Description: With the addition of “cravings” to the DSM V criteria for substance use disorders, it became that much more important to learn new skills to assist our clients in this area. Just as addiction effects every area of life, so too must the approach for cravings management. The goals for this workshop will be to review the literature on cravings management techniques, discuss cravings management medications and elicit a discussion of multi-faceted approaches that have worked for those on the front lines of addiction treatment.

 


Plenary & Evening Tracks

 

C401. The Opioid Crisis and MAT (3.25 hrs.) (Tuesday Afternoon; 1:45-5:15 p.m.)

Facilitators: Ed Baker
Description: This presentation addresses the current public health crisis in America specific to Severe Opioid Use Disorder. We begin with a review of recent history and the factors leading up to this crisis, then discuss the present state of affairs. Includes a definition of Severe Opioid Use Disorder, with particular attention to brain disease and dysfunction in affected individuals. Also includes an overview of current MAT for Opioid Use Disorder and current measures to shape Opioid Rx trends.
(Sponsored by: Burlington Labs)

 


C402. Overview of PTSD & Veteran’s Issues (3.25 hrs.) (Tuesday Afternoon; 1:45-5:15 p.m.)

Facilitator: Nyi Myint, MSW, MBA, LCSW-A, LCAS-A
Description: This block of instruction will cover the origins of PTSD and other anxiety disorders associated with trauma and sub-trauma events. Special consideration is given to Piaget’s theory of cognitive development. Additional topics of discussion include maladaptive behavior variations of schema and schema modes as described by Dr. Jeffrey Young. The discussion follows with special considerations of the development of trauma with regard to veterans as well as specific veteran’s issues not necessarily associated with trauma. This block concludes with a brief discussion of evidence-based treatment modalities.

 


C403. Current Trends with Drugs of Abuse (3.25 hrs.) (Tuesday Afternoon; 1:45-5:15 p.m.)

Facilitator: Darryl Inaba, PharmD, CATC-V, CADC III
Description: Discoveries of new abusable Phytochemicals and synthetic designer drugs molecules along with the continued proliferation of diverted prescription and OTC medications creates a significant challenge to the recognition and treatment of current drug abuse and addiction problems. “Spice, Bath Salts, Benzo Fury, Flakka, Kratom, Salvia, 2C-I” and many other substances have recently exploded within the drug abusing subculture with severe adverse consequences. Despite their mystique, all can be generally viewed as being CNS stimulants, depressants or psychedelics: AKA – Uppers, Downers, All Arounders. This presentation will explore these trends then provide an update on what is known about their pharmacology and toxicology. How they complicate diagnosis and treatment of addiction and mental health disorders will also be explored. Modification of molecules to circumvent detection and legal sanctions is almost infinite. Designer Drug modifications will be defined and explained.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: Dominion Diagnostics)

 


C404. Domestic Violence (3.25 hrs.) (Tuesday Afternoon; 1:45-5:15 p.m.)

Facilitator: Bea Cote’
Description: Domestic violence (DV) is one of the most common, most lethal, and yet challenging, issues clinicians encounter today. This track will provide current and relevant basic information about DV, followed by more specific information about the abusers themselves, and the role substance abuse plays in increasing the risk to victims. Attendees will then learn how to recognize DV in their clients and client relationships and will be able to protect victims; hold abusers accountable, and determine whether, when, and where to refer clients out for services.
(Please note: this is an interactive-style course.)

 


C405. The New & Revised ASAM Criteria (3.25 hrs.) (Tuesday Afternoon; 1:45-5:15 p.m.)

Facilitator: Gerald Shulman, M.A., M.A.C., FACATA
Description: This workshop is designed for participants who have already had exposure to the ASAM Criteria as well as those for whom it is new. Discussion will focus on the ASAM Dimensions and Levels of Care. Those components of the Criteria with which clinicians sometimes struggle such as: (1) multiple uses for Level I; (2) performing continued stay and discharge/transfer reviews; (3) the distinctions between the different residential services; (5) discriminating between inpatient, residential and outpatient treatment with supportive living; (6) emphasis on co-occurring mental health problems and disorders in Dimension 3; and (7) the differences in assessment of Dimension3 between new adolescents and adults. Significant attention will be paid to co-occurring disorders as well as the Substance Use and Addictive Disorders section of the DSM-5. The workshop will include a case study and the presentation of a model of an ASAM-based clinical record which avoids simply adding “more paperwork” and ties together the assessment, treatment plan and progress notes.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: McLeod Addictive Disease Center)


C406. Why Gender Matters: Creating Services for Women & Girls (3.25 hrs.) (Tuesday Afternoon; 1:45-5:15 p.m.)

Facilitator: Twyla Wilson, LCSW, ACSW
Description: We often hear the term gender-responsive used in relation to substance abuse, mental health and trauma treatment for women. But what does it actually mean and what does it actually look like? These are some of the underlying questions motivating the lifelong work of Dr. Covington, a pioneer in the development of gender-responsive treatment programs curricula. This presentation focuses on the process of trauma across the female lifespan and the need for gender-responsive and trauma-informed services. It also provides research-based resources for women’s and girls’ services.
(Sponsored by: Sponsored by: Magnolia Landing)


 


D100. Grandma’s In The Sauce Again (2.5 hrs.)(Monday Luncheon Opening Session)

Facilitator: Gerald Shulman, M.A., M.A.C., FACATA
Description: More older adults are admitted to acute care hospitals for alcohol-related disorders than for heart attacks!!! This workshop will describe the challenges of assessment, intervention and treatment of older adults with substance use and co-occurring mental health problems. There will be discussion of six major problems areas encountered when working with older adults with substance-related disorders: (1) identification; (2) diagnosis; (3 assessment; (4) intervention; (5) referral; and (6) treatment. Appropriate responses to problems in each of the areas will be presented. A broad-based gerontological assessment process will be discussed with emphasis on co-occurring disorders. Older adult specific assessment instruments for depression, dementia and substance use disorders will be presented, including the newest screening instrument for problems with alcohol, prescribed and over-the-counter medications. As part of good mental health, the myths and realities of sexuality among older adults will be discussed.
(Sponsored by: McLeod Addictive Disease Center)

 


D200. Beyond Anger & Violence: A Program for Women (2 hrs.)(Monday Afternoon Plenary)

Facilitator: Twyla Wilson, LCSW, ACSW
Description: We live in a world where anger and violence are all around us. They are in the news, in our television shows and motion pictures, and often in our families and relationships. Anger often is connected to violence and, in some cases, leads to violence. Even though anger is the most common emotion, many people find it difficult to understand and regulate their anger. Beyond Anger and Violence (BAV) is a program for women who struggle with issues related to anger.
Anger itself is not a problem; how it is manifested or expressed often creates a problem. A core piece of the work in Beyond Anger and Violence is to help a woman identify her anger, how she deals with it, and its effects in her life. The participants learn to develop ways of managing their anger in ways that do not cause them problems. The program is structured to work on two levels: one is the anger that the women experience in whatever forms; the other is the anger and violence they have experienced from others.
The training is designed to explain and explore the topics of anger on multiple levels: the personal level (the anger women feel); the relationship level, including anger directed toward them; and the effects of anger and violence in our communities and society at large. This is an interactive training that integrates the evidence-based practices of cognitive-behavioral, relational, mindful, and expressive-arts therapeutic techniques into a holistic approach to anger.
(Sponsored by: Magnolia Landing)

 


D300. Addicted to Addiction (1.5 hrs.)(Friday Luncheon)

Facilitator: Frank Fornari
Description: An overview of the neurochemistry and neurogenetic basis of behavior as it pertains to the natural process of addiction.
(Sponsored by: Dominion Diagnostics)

 


E100. Open AA Meeting “SUDS” : Sad, Under the influence, Desperate, Sober (1 hrs.)(Monday Evening)

Facilitator: May Craven
Description: From being an isolating drunk to life now as a Presbyterian Pastor, May S. tells of her desperation as an active alcoholic, the effects of alcoholism on her emotional, mental, physical, and spiritual being, her journey to sobriety, the treatment, and what life is like today.

 


E200. AlaNon Meeting (1 hr.)(Monday Evening)

Level: Basic
Facilitator: Susan Reed

 


E300. How Narcotics Anonymous can help, and how someone can find Narcotics Anonymous (1 hr.) (Monday Evening)

Level: Basic
Facilitator: Jordan R.; & Paul A.
Description: Narcotics Anonymous (NA) is a worldwide fellowship that is available to anyone seeking freedom from active addiction. In this panel presentation we will address some of the history of Narcotics Anonymous, the resources we have available to find us in your area, and some of our personal experience in being involved with NA.
(Sponsored by: Narcotics Anonymous)

 


E400. “The Hungry Heart” Film and Discussion (2 hrs.)(Tuesday Evening)

Facilitators: Ed Baker, & NCFADS Board Member
Description: The Hungry Heart provides an intimate look at the often hidden world of prescription drug addiction through the world of Vermont Pediatrician Fred Holmes who works with patients struggling with this disease.
Dr. Holmes prescribes suboxone to his patients struggling with prescription drug addiction. Much like methadone, suboxone helps many addicts in their recovery process– for some taking suboxone is a crucial stepping stone to long term recovery, for others it is a crutch, for others suboxone is abused and diverted onto the street. Through the film we see Dr. Holmes struggling with these challenges and trying to make sense and keep the faith in the midst of many contradictions.
Most importantly however, as the film progresses we begin to see the simple but profound connection that Dr. Holmes creates with each patient The film shines a light on the healing power of conversation and the need for connection that many of these young addicts yearn for but do not have in their lives.
In addition, the film interviews a number of older addicts who talk about their recovery process juxtaposed against Fred’s patients. The road to recovery is paved with both success stories and strewn with relapses, downfalls and tragic losses (credit Sadler). However, through the movie we see the many faces and diverse populations of addiction, and their continued search for a life of recovery.

(Sponsored by: Burlington Labs)

 


E500. “Cannabinyzed: Physical and Mental Effects of Marijuana” Film and Discussion (1 hrs.)(Wednesday Evening)

Facilitator: Darryl Inaba, PharmD, CATC-V, CADC III
Description: As the legal status of marijuana changes its perceived dangers are lessening while the potency of the drug is increasing. This video covers marijuana as a psychoactive substance that induces its effects by manipulation of natural brain chemicals known as the endocannabinoids. The toxic and addictive impact that results from the drug’s disruption of natural endocannibinoids is characterized in this video by the testimony of those impacted by the drug and by the scientists who are studying its effects.
The video is 26 minutes and will help to clarify the many myths and misconceptions regarding the effects of marijuana. This session will also include discussion.
(Sponsored by: Dominion Diagnostics)

 


E600. “Understanding the Biology of Desire: Personal Journey of Ice Cream Addiction and Recovery from Cancer” Film and Discussion (1 hrs.)(Wednesday Evening)

Facilitator: John Femino, MD, FASAM, MRO
Description: This session is an unique opportunity to hear the personal story of a recovering cancer patient whose addiction to ice cream was “cured” after radiation and chemotherapy. Dr. Femino will explore the nature of addiction prior to his cancer diagnosis by showing a videotape that he produced 30 years ago (and appears as himself), entitled “Ice Cream Dreams”. This tape is part of an award winning series of videotape projects utilized for medical and secondary school education in which non-threatening analogies would allow for discussion of the neurobiology of addictive behavior without dredging up painful stigmatized images of addiction. The irony of this story is personal in that chemotherapy and radiation wiped out his love for, tolerance of and desire for ice cream. This workshop details the loss of and then the regaining of his appetite, similar to the restoration of reward pathways from other more powerful addictive drugs. These humorous personal insights provide a richer understanding of the neurobiology of addiction and recovery. Participants will receive a free digital version of “Ice Cream Dreams” for their use in educational and treatment settings. This session will also include discussion.
(Sponsored by: Dominion Diagnostics)

 


— Meet Our Keynote Speakers —

 

NCFADS Summer School Speaker,Gerald Shulman
Gerald Shulman

NCFADS Summer School Speaker, Twyla Wilson
Twyla Wilson

NCFADS Summer School Speaker, Darryl Inaba
Darryl Inaba

NCFADS Summer School Speaker, Frank Fornari
Frank Fornari

— Speaker Bios —

 


Al Greene, MSW, CCS, LCAS

retired in 2004 from Appalachian State University as Professor Emeritus in the Department of Human Development and Psychological Counseling, where he taught for thirty-one years. He has consulted and conducted training events widely in North Carolina and the Southeast, Nicaragua and Bolivia on addictions treatment issues and is currently a member of the North Carolina Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board.


Brenden Hargett

is a Ph.D. candidate in the Rehabilitation Counseling and Rehabilitation Counselor Education program at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Greensboro, NC. Brenden is a Licensed Professional Counselor, (LPC) a Licensed Clinical Addiction Specialist (LCAS), and Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC). Brenden is currently the Clinical Operations Coordinator with the Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services, Social Services Division, in Greensboro, NC. Brenden has extensive clinical experience in a variety of settings and serves as a Consultant/Trainer for the North Carolina Evidenced Based Practices Center. Currently, Brenden serves on the Board of Directors for the North Carolina Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies and the Curriculum Review Committee of the Parent Academy for Guilford County Schools. He has previously served as adjunct faculty at Winston Salem State University and North Carolina A&T State University. Brenden has acquired knowledge and expertise in program development and implementation, clinical supervision, and leadership development. He works tirelessly on workforce development strategies with the intent to bridge the gap between research and practice while creating a more comprehensive behavioral health service system.


Darlene Hopkins, Ph.D., LPCS, LCAS, CCS

studied Educational and Counseling Psychology at Indiana University, where she completed both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees and graduated with honors. She has earned several credentials since, including her Ph.D. in Counseling from Atlantic Coast Seminary. She holds national certification as a counselor and a master’s-level psychologist. She is licensed by the North Carolina Board of Licensed Professional Counselors, and is a Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist and Certified Clinical Supervisor. She teaches as an adjunct faculty member at Methodist University and serves as an internship supervisor for several area graduate schools. Dr. Hopkins has over 25 years of experience in practicing and teaching counseling and psychology. She has served Methodist University as the Director of Counseling and Psychological Services since 1993.


Darryl S. Inaba, PharmD, CATC-V, CADC III

Dr. Darryl S. Inaba is currently the Director of Clinical and Behavioral Health Service, Addictions Recovery Center, Medford Oregon and Director of Research and Education at CNS Productions, Inc. in Medford Oregon. Dr. Inaba is a Lifetime Fellow at Haight Ashbury Free Clinics in San Francisco and Associate Clinical Professor of Pharmacy at the University Of California San Francisco School Of Pharmacy. He also serves as Special Consultant/Instructor for the University of Utah School on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies. Dr. Inaba has served on numerous boards and commissions and he has received over 90 individual awards of merit. He earned a Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of California, San Francisco School of Pharmacy in 1971 and is a Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor (CATC) Level V and a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor III. Dr. Inaba is the author of several publications and award winning educational videos on all aspects of substance abuse work. He is a co-author of Uppers, Downers, All Arounders; the principal text on substance use disorders being used in over 400 U.S. universities and six foreign languages.


Jessica L. Garfield, LCPC, CEAP, PCGC, ICCGC, CADC, Problem Gambling Services Coordinator

is a member of BDA’s Problem Gambling Services Team and provides assessment, counseling, crisis intervention and referral services on the North Carolina Problem Gambling Help Line. Ms. Garfield Coordinates BDA’s award winning Call to Change (C2C) Program and conducts follow up phone calls to gamblers and concerned others who contact the help line. Ms. Garfield has been a Lead Trainer for the North Carolina Problem Gambling Program’s Sure Bet training series for the past three years.
Additionally Ms. Garfield is responsible for internal Problem Gambling Counseling training as well as new hire orientation of help line counselors, reporting, billing & clinical operations of the North Carolina Problem Gambling Help Line.


Lynn B. Jones, LPC, LCAS

is the Program Manager for Services for People with DWI Offenses, within the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services.  She has been with the Division since 2005. She has a graduate degree in Substance Abuse Counseling and Rehabilitation Counseling from East Carolina University. She is the Division appointee on the NC Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board. 


David Ledgerwood, PhD

Dr. Ledgerwood is a Clinical Psychologist, an addiction researcher and Associate Professor in the Substance Abuse Research Division, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, Michigan. His work primarily focuses on etiology and treatment of gambling disorder and other addictive disorders. Dr. Ledgerwood has published several research articles on problem gambling focusing on areas including co-occurring psychopathology, impulse control and executive function, treatment outreach, and treatment effectiveness. His recent research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, The MDCH Office of Recovery Oriented Systems of Care, and the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre. He is also a paneled provider of problem gambling treatment services in Michigan.


Aaron Stevens, LPC, PCGC
Clinical & Special Programs Associate, BDA | Morneau Shepell

Mr. Stevens received his Masters Degree in Organizational Psychology from the Adler School of Professional Psychology.  He is currently a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and Problem and Compulsive Gambling Counselor (PCGC).  Mr. Stevens is a member of BDA | Morneau Shepell’s clinical team working as an EAP and Problem Gambling counselor.  He provides assessment, counseling services, crisis management, and referrals in his work with EAP and problem gambling clients. In addition, Mr. Stevens provides support to technological initiatives at BDA | Morneau Shepell, developing and maintaining programs on SMS and mobile platforms. He has also provided trainings in both EAP and Problem Gambling services.


Danny Graves, LCAS, CCS

is currently a Clinical Supervisor at the McLeod Addictive Disease Center in Charlotte, NC. His specific responsibilities include designing and implementing supervision plans with clinical staff, ongoing individual and group supervision, training and education to staff, etc. Previous employment positions include Narcotic Treatment Program Manager, Compliance Director, Adult Outpatient Director, Team Program Leader, and Adolescent Facility Coordinator/Counselor.


Geri Miller, Ph.D.

Diplomate in Counseling Psychology, American Board of Professional Psychology, is a Full Professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychological Counseling (Clinical Mental Health Counseling Track) at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. In North Carolina, Dr. Miller is a Licensed Psychologist, a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Clinical Addictions Specialist, and a Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board Certified Clinical Supervisor. She has also received a Certificate of Proficiency in the Treatment of Alcohol and other Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders from the American Psychological Association College of Professional Psychology. Dr. Miller has worked in the counseling profession since 1976 and in the addictions field since1979. She is a volunteer with the American Red Cross Disaster Mental Health Services and works as a volunteer psychologist at the Watauga County Health Department. Dr. Miller has published and presented research on counseling. In 2010 she published a third edition of her book on addiction counseling, Learning the Language of Addiction Counseling, with Wiley Press. In 2003 she also published a book with Wiley Press, Incorporating Spirituality in Counseling and Psychotherapy. She is currently a member of the American Psychological Association’s Psychology of Religion (Division 36) and Addictions (Division 50) and the American Counseling Association’s divisions of the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC) and the International Association of Addictions and Offender Counselors (IAAOC). She is treasurer of the North Carolina ASERVIC division, Humanist division, and IAAOC division.


John P. Femino, MD, FASAM

Dr. John Femino is Medical Director and President of the Meadows Edge Recovery Center, a multidisciplinary medical and mental health group practice, and substance abuse treatment program in Rhode Island. He received his MD from Brown University, and is board certified in addiction medicine and internal medicine.  Dr. Femino has received a number of grants for alcohol and substance abuse-related projects, and was the recipient of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Career Teacher in Alcohol and Drug Abuse grant at Brown University, where he taught for nearly 20 years. Dr. Femino has been active in ASAM for over 30 years, serving on the national board of directors as New England Regional Director and as President of the Rhode Island Society of Addiction Medicine. He frequently lectures on topics including the neurobiology of addiction and recovery, pain management in the addicted patient, diagnostic criteria for addiction, drug testing in addiction medicine, SBIRT, and insurance coding and billing. He has participated as writer/reviewer for ASAM buprenorphine publications, drug testing and public policy on marijuana, and is on the ASAM Quality Improvement Council and Legislative Advocacy Committee.


Lynn Inman, CSAS, CSAPC

has worked in a variety of areas ranging from community coalition building to inpatient treatment for over 25 years. He is credentialed by the NC Substance Abuse Professional Practice Board (NCSAPPB) as a CSAC and CSAPC. Lynn graduated from Elon University in 1986 with a bachelor’s in Philosophy and Psychology. He is a member of NCSAPPB where he is the Chair of the Ethics Committee.


Nyi Myint, MSW, MBA, LCSW-A, LCAS-A

served in the United State Army for twenty-five years, retiring at the rank of Major to pursue a career in human services. He is a veteran of Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom and served during a NATO treaty enforcement tour in Bosnia. He has a Masters of Business Administration from Pfeiffer University, a Masters of Social Work from the University of North Carolina Charlotte and a graduate certificate in substance abuse from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. He has worked clinically as a substance abuse counselor at the Freedom House Recovery Center in the Facility Based Crisis Unit. He is also a paramedic and trained in the treatment of post- traumatic stress disorder. Mr. Myint joined the staff of the Alcohol / Drug Council of North Carolina in 2013 becoming the clinical program manager on a project that provides no-cost substance abuse assessments and brief intervention services to members of the North Carolina National Guard. In August 2013, ADCNC was awarded a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services grant to provide Affordable Care Act Navigation services specifically to people in recovery in North Carolina. Project Jumpstart is providing outreach to people and assisting them with enrolling in the federal Healthcare Marketplace. Mr. Myint is providing leadership to the project’s network of navigators who are primarily people in recovery or clinical specialist in behavioral health who are committed themselves to improving the access of people to both whole-health services through access to healthcare insurance.


Shannon Warren

Program Director at Carolinas CARE Partnership, has worked in HIV since 1999, holding a variety of positions including Prevention Manager, Development Director, Operations Director, Executive Director, and Training Manager. Currently she writes grants and manages prevention, testing, linkage to care, and housing programs, as well as provides training across the state. She is an award-winning professional who spends time in the community, serving as Co-Chair of the Mecklenburg County HIV/AIDS Council and as a member of the HIV/AIDS Coalition, the Homeless Services Network, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Housing First workgroup, the Continuum of Care, and is on the Board of Directors of the Center for Prevention Services, as well as an active member of PFLAG.  Shannon spends her spare time with her children and her black lab/beagle mix dog, she cooks, she runs, she reads, and she watches Big Bang Theory re-runs on TV.

Registration Options and Fees

Full-School Resident Option (Includes 4 Nights Lodging*)
$697.00

Includes:

  • Training & materials for the entire school including Opening Sessions, one Main Track, one Mini Track, one Tuesday afternoon Plenary, Closing Session and optional Extra Credit Evening Sessions.
  • Lunches Monday through Friday and Breakfast Tuesday through Friday.
  • Residential housing for Monday through Thursday night.
  • Up to 35 Credit Hours based on attendance.
  • *Please note that there is a refundable $50 key deposit required at check-in (payable by cash or check). The deposit will be returned at check-out.

 


Full-School Commuter Option
$615.00

Includes:

  • Training & materials for the entire school including Opening Sessions, one Main Track, one Mini Track, one Tuesday afternoon Plenary, Closing Session and optional Extra Credit Evening Sessions.
  • Lunches Monday through Friday.
  • Up to 35 Credit Hours based on attendance.

 


Main Track Only Resident Option (Includes 3 Nights Lodging**)
$450.00

Includes:

  • Training & materials for one Main Track, Closing Session and optional Extra Credit Evening Sessions.
  • Lunch and breakfast Wednesday through Friday.
  • Residential housing Tuesday through Thursday night.
  • Up to 21 Credit Hours based on attendance.
  • **Check-in 1-5 pm at Warwick Building; and 7-9 pm at Innovation Residence Hall (Formerly Known as “International Residence Hall”). Please note that there is a refundable $50 key deposit required at check-in (payable by cash or check). The deposit will be returned at check-out.

 


Main Track Only Commuter Option
$360.00

Includes:

  • Training & materials for one Main Track, Closing Session and optional Extra Credit Evening Sessions.
  • Lunch Wednesday through Friday.
  • Up to 21 Credit Hours based on attendance.

 


Tuesday Only Commuter Option
$155.00

Includes:

  • Training & materials for one Mini Track, one Tuesday Afternoon Plenary and optional Tuesday evening Extra Credit Session.
  • Lunch on Tuesday.
  • Up to 8.5 Credit Hours based on attendance.

 



NCFADS School Registration Information

First, use the online registration form to complete the registration process and submit to NCFADS by 11:59 p.m., July 20, 2016.

 

Registration-Button-PNG
Click here to register for Summer School
 
Second, Full Time Students must validate the registration process at check-in between 10 am – noon on Monday, July 25, 2016 in the Warwick Center on UNC Wilmington Campus. Main Track and Tuesday Only Student enrollees may check-in on Tuesday, July 26th at the Warwick Building between 1-5 pm, or at Innovation Residence Hall (Formerly Known as “International Residence Hall”) if arriving between 7pm and 9pm.

On-Campus Residence Key Deposit
For on-campus residents during the Summer School, please note that there is a refundable $50 key deposit required at check-in. The deposit will be returned at check-out.

*Early enrollment is suggested since space is limited and courses are assigned on a first-come, first-served basis. (Online registration is preferred and may expedite the process.)

For multiple registrations, a registration form for each participant must be completed and accompanied by payment and/or official authorizations. If you are registering for someone else, make certain all pertinent information is forwarded to him or her.

If you need assistance concerning registration, please call the NCFADS office at 910-799-6594.

 


 

Helpful Tips

  • Since early registration is necessary to improve your chances of getting your top track choices, the following suggestions are offered:
    If you plan to stay at the Townhomes Suites or Best Western, you must call directly to the hotels to get the negotiated rate. Identify yourself as a participant in the NCFADS Summer School.
  • At the earliest possible date after receiving word the registration process is open, complete the online registration form. Online registration for all classes is preferred.
  • Do not assume that your registration form will be processed by your accounting office or an administrative official before the deadline date. To avoid delays, submit your form online to the Foundation office and fax or email a short, written approval statement from your supervisor while the agency is processing payment. In most cases, this can save you 3 to 4 weeks in getting registered. Fax#910-799-9550; mailing address NCFADS, PO Box 4024, Wilmington, NC, 28406.; email: ncfads@outlook.com
  • Review your completed registration form to assure the following:
    • Your Main Track, Mini Track and Plenary choices have been indicated.
    • All credit option choices have been selected.
    • All demographic information is clearly printed or typed. A correct email address is necessary for receiving your credit letters following the school.
    • Payment or an authorization statement by an agency official or an approved purchase order or scholarship authorization must accompany each completed registration form.
    • Participants seeking special accommodations due to a disability must contact the registration office by June 1, 2016.

 


 

Student Responsibilities

As a student of the school sponsored by the North Carolina Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies, you are requested to read and abide by the following statements:
You should act as a professional when dealing with staff or others who are registered for the school.

The use of alcohol and/or illicit drugs or the abuse of non-prescription drugs while at the school will not be tolerated. If such conduct is observed, NCFADS officials will ask for assistance from local law enforcement personnel. If the student is charged with a violation or continues to demonstrate behaviors detrimental to others or is considered disruptive to the mission of the school, NCFADS will immediately ask the student to leave the school; and will report the incident to the students’ employer.

The use of physical means to settle a dispute will not be tolerated. If such conduct is used by a student(s), the NCFADS staff will ask for assistance by local law enforcement personnel. If the student is charged with a violation or continues to demonstrate behaviors detrimental to others or is considered disruptive to the mission of the school, NCFADS will immediately ask the student to leave the school; and will report the incident to the students’ employer.

At the time of pre-registration, you should reveal to the NCFADS staff any serious medical condition which might cause problems while at the school. This will ensure that, in the event of an emergency, you may be treated with appropriate care by EMT or other medical professionals.

Students, who, for what ever reason are taken to a local hospital or medical clinic for treatment, must arrange for any needed transportation.

At the time of pre-registration, you will be asked to furnish the name of a family member or another designee as a contact person in case of an emergency.

At the time of pre-registration, you will be asked for a current email and mailing address. The accuracy of these addresses is necessary for receiving your credit letter after the school.

The North Carolina Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies (NCFADS) cordially invites all Summer School participants to join in the 40th Anniversary festivities this year with a River Cruise at Carolina Beach on Thursday, July 28th. Guests will enjoy laughs, heavy hors d’oeuvres, music, dancing and networking.

Registered Summer School participants will receive an email invitation prior to the Summer School, containing a registration and payment link for the River Cruise.

 

NCFADS 40th Anniversary River Cruise at Carolina Beach
Thursday, July 28, 2016
6pm to 8pm | $20 per Person

Winner Boats
100 Carl Winner Drive
Carolina Beach, NC 28428

Special Thanks to Dominon Diagnostics
for Sponsoring Our 40th Anniversary Dinner Cruise!

Curriculum Credit Information

The Winter School has been designed to serve the needs of many professional groups. Al types of school credit are included in the school cost. All choice(s)of credit must be indicated on the registration form during the pre-registration period.

Substance Abuse Professional Credit (SAC)

Application for approval has been made to the North Carolina Substance Abuse Professional Certification Board for up to XX hours of certification/re-certification credit for each eligible participant.

Teacher Renewal Credit (PSP)

Individual schedules must be designed for XX contact hours to be awarded X.X units of teacher renewal credit (PSP). To receive maximum PSP credits, participants must attend all classes and special events, totaling XX hours, in which they are officially registered. TEACHERS PLEASE NOTE that you must get prior approval of this event from your school system before registering.

Continuing Education Units (CEU’S)

Individual schedules must be designed for a maximum of XX contact hours for participants to be eligible for X.X CEU’s. To receive maximum CEU credit, participants must attend all classes and events, totaling XX hours, in which they are officially registered.

National Board Certified Counselors (NBCC)

The N.C. Foundation for Alcohol and Drug Studies is an approved NBCC Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC approved clock hours for events or programs that meet NBCC requirements. Programs for which NBCC clock hours will be awarded are identified within the NCFADS Winter School catalog. The ACEP is solely responsible for all aspects of this school offering. NBCC (provider number 5673). We adhere to NBCC Continuing Education guidelines. As a minimum, each individual schedule must be comprised of a curriculum track representing XX.X hours. Participants must attend all track classes to receive the XX.X-hour track maximum. Attendance in all other sessions will add XX.X additional hours to the total number of NBCC credit hours awarded. (NBCC is also appropriate for those seeking LPC credits.)

Appropriate credit for the Summer School will be awarded after eligibility has been determined from attendance records and in conjunction with the above stated attendance requirements.

For those who choose to stay off campus and attend the school as a commuter, the NCFADS Board has negotiated the following lodging discounts for you to chose from while at the 2016 Summer School:

Townplace Suites

305 Eastwood Road
Wilmington, NC 28403

Special Daily Rates of $70.00 + tax (single room).

Special group rates have been negotiated with the TownePlace Suites, 305 Eastwood Rd., Wilmington, NC, 28403. A rate of $70.00 plus tax is available for all NCFADS registrants. Registrations must be made by June 25, 2016. For reservations call: 910.332.3326 and state you are with the NC Alcohol & Drug School (NCFADS).

All lodging/housing arrangements must be made directly with Townplace Suites.

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott

307 Eastwood Road
Wilmington, NC 28403

Special Daily Rates of $89.00 + tax.

The Fairfield Inn & Suites (Eastwood Rd.) A special rate of $89 plus taxes is offered to the NCFADS Summer Drug & Alcohol School participants. For room reservations call: 910.791.8082  (Deadline is June 24, 2016).

All lodging/housing arrangements must be made directly with Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott.

Special Thanks to our 2016 NCFADS Summer School Sponsors

Dominion Diagnostics

McLeod Addictive Disease Center

DHHS-K(white_matte)

ATTC

Magnolia Landing cropped-logo

Burlington Labs

For Multiple Registrations

a registration form for each participant must be completed and accompanied by payment and/or official authorizations. If you are registering for someone else, make certain all pertinent information is forwarded to him or her.

 

Need Assistance?

If you need assistance concerning registration, please call the NCFADS office at 910-799-6594.

Support NCFADS by Sponsoring and/or Exhibiting at the 2016 Summer School

become-a-sponsor-button

[ Register as a Sponsor and/or Exhibitor Online ]